Tag Archive | "Vol 33 No 6 | February 1 – February 7"

Nakano named to Washington Health Benefit Exchange board

Nakano named to Washington Health Benefit Exchange board

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Hiroshi Nakano (Photo courtesy of ICHS)

The International Community Health Services (ICHS) has announced the appointment of its ICHS board secretary Hiroshi Nakano to the Washington Health Benefit Exchange board.

Nakano, a native of Fife, has been with ICHS for 16 years, serving in a variety of leadership positions on the board. He earned his undergraduate degree in sociology from the University of Washington and his MBA at Cornell University.

As a member of the Board of the Benefits Exchange, Nakano wants “to make sure that the Exchange stays responsive to the consumer and provides the broadest possible access to the public, especially to vulnerable and underserved populations and those who have difficulty accessing the website.”

Nakano is the chief executive officer of NeoSpine, a spine surgery and pain management practice based in Puyallup, with additional offices in Seattle and Poulsbo. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Lunar New Year celebration held at Westminster Chapel

Lunar New Year celebration held at Westminster Chapel

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The Seattle Chinese Community Girls’ Drill Team members Neka Ton, Sage Choi, Alison Kojima, and Kacey Ton performed at the Lunar New Year celebration at Westminster Chapel. (Photo by Marino Saito/NWAW)

Chinese Lunar New Year was celebrated at Westminster Chapel in Bellevue on Jan. 25. Westminster Chapel began celebrating the Lunar New Year 11 years ago and now shares sponsorship of the event with various schools and nonprofit organizations. This event was not only about Chinese culture, but other Asian cultures, such as Korean, Vietnamese, and Japanese. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Kin On elects board & officers

Kin On elects board & officers

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Darryl Hue

Kin On, the organization that supports the elderly and adults in the greater Seattle Asian American community, recently named Randy Chan, Minh Ngo, Marcella Wing, Teri Wong, and David Yip as new board members for 2014. In addition, the following executive committee officers were elected: Darryl Hue, Stella Leong as first vice president, Hannah Wong as second vice president, Daniel Chan as secretary, and David Lee as treasurer. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Two physicians join Polyclinic

Two physicians join Polyclinic

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Divya Singh (left) and Sean Keem

The Polyclinic recently hired hand surgeon Divya Singh and orthopedic spine surgeon Sean Keem. Both physicians will be based at The Polyclinic Madison Center, located at 904 7th Ave. in Seattle. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

AALDEF applauds bipartisan bill to modernize the Voting Rights Act — Asian Americans ‘continue to face significant obstacles to the vote’

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) commends the introduction of bipartisan legislation offering common sense fixes to modernize the Voting Rights Act (VRA). This bill will address the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County v. Holder by ensuring greater protections for all voters against discrimination at the ballot box and ensuring that limited English proficient Americans are guaranteed the right to vote. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (1)

Investigation in Vietnamese woman’s L.A. beating death stymied by silence

Investigation in Vietnamese woman’s L.A. beating death stymied by silence

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Kim Pham

SANTA ANA (AP) – Police detectives are having trouble unraveling a nightclub brawl that left a 23-year-old Vietnamese American woman dead because they can’t identify many of the victim’s friends and others won’t talk to them. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Claim filed by family of Asiana crash victim

Claim filed by family of Asiana crash victim

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Ye Meng Yuan

By The Associated Press

The parents of a teenage girl who was run over and killed by two emergency vehicles after an Asiana Airlines crash have filed a claim against the city of San Francisco, saying rescuers were reckless and poorly trained.

In legal forms filed this week in San Francisco, attorneys for the parents of 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan say firefighters who first saw the girl after the July 6 crash should have examined her and moved her somewhere safe. Firefighters told investigators they assumed the girl was dead and hurried on toward the damaged aircraft. An autopsy revealed Yuan was alive before the vehicles hit her. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7, World NewsComments (0)

Judge OK’s anti-bias policy for Seattle police

Judge OK’s anti-bias policy for Seattle police

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Judge James L. Robart

SEATTLE (AP) – A federal judge has approved new Seattle Police Department policies designed to eliminate concerns over biased policing and unjustified stops. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

New Chinatown store selling pipes, not pot

New Chinatown store selling pipes, not pot

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Richard Saguin (Photo by Assunta Ng/NWAW)

Trichome, a new “elevated glassware & design” store that sells pipes and other products for cannabis use, has opened for business in the International District. The new store is located at 618 South Jackson Street. Read the full story

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Lynnwood seeks Korean for its diversity commission

Lynnwood’s Neighborhoods and Demographic Diversity Commission, a seven-member volunteer advisory body, is currently accepting applications to fill two vacancies. Special effort is being given to recruit a member of the Korean community. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

UW offers master’s in international studies

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington is accepting applications for its new 10-month Master of Arts (MA) degree in Applied International Studies (MAAIS). This accelerated program is designed for U.S. and international professionals with experience in a variety of fields, including business, government, military, philanthropy, and international development. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Japanese Americans remember wartime incarceration

The stories of local Japanese Americans who were incarcerated in Idaho concentration camps during World War II are the subject of a talk by Tom Ikeda, founder and executive director of “Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project,” on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. at the Longhouse Cultural Center on the Evergreen campus in Olympia. Admission is free and open to the public. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Celebrate Lunar New Year in the ID neighborhood

Celebrate Lunar New Year in the ID neighborhood

By Marino Saito
Northwest Asian Weekly

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Children’s Parade in 2013. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

The Lunar New Year is a major holiday for the Chinese and other Asian cultures. This is the Year of the Horse. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Cultures, Features, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

A look at Year of the Horse celebrities

A look at Year of the Horse celebrities

By Nina Huang
Northwest Asian Weekly

The Year of the Horse lands on Jan. 31. It is said to be a good year for those who are hardworking, who persevere, and who want to achieve success. Some horse traits include being popular, intelligent, talented, and kind. On the other hand, they can also be stubborn, too talkative, and impatient. Here’s a look at some celebrities who exemplify their horse traits, some more than others.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_ghengis.jpgGenghis Khan, born circa 1162, was the founder and emperor of the Mongol Empire. At age 20, he built a large army with the intent to destroy individual tribes in Northeast Asia and unite them under his rule. Like a true horse, Genghis was successful in running his empire well until after his death in 1227. Fifty years after his death, his empire became the biggest in history, forging a historical link between Asia, Europe, and the Muslim world.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_abe.jpgShinzo Abe (1954) is the current prime minister of Japan. He became Japan’s youngest prime minister since World War II, and is the first to be born after the war. During his term, with the horse’s strength, Abe has notably fortified Japan’s strategic ties with Africa, India, the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and Taiwan.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_chan.jpgJackie Chan (1954) has become one of the biggest Hong Kong celebrities to make it big in America. Known for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts, Chan has appeared in over 150 films since the 1960s. Rumble in the Bronx, Rush Hour, and Who Am I? were among some of his biggest blockbuster hits. Without a doubt, Chan resembles the ideal horse, as he has won over his audiences with his popularity and successful acting career.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_lee.jpgAng Lee (1954) is a Taiwanese American film director, screenwriter, and producer, and two-time Academy Award recipient for Best Director (Brokeback Mountain in 2005 and Life of Pi in 2012). Success has been a common pattern for this horse throughout his directing career. Also known for his films Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Lust, Caution, Lee has been able to transcend cultural and linguistic barriers to speak to global audiences.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_ling.jpgBai Ling (1966) is a Chinese American actress who has starred in The Crow, Wild Wild West, and TV shows including Entourage and Lost. But Ling might be more known for her appearance on the Playboy magazine cover, appearance on Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew, or her shoplifting incident at the airport in 2008.

Unlike her other horse peers, her success and popularity has been impeded by her public image and troubles over the years.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_tamlyn.jpgTamlyn Tomita (1966) was a beauty queen before she got her big break as an actress in The Karate Kid II. Her other major role was in The Joy Luck Club, which was based on the eponymous 1989 novel by Amy Tan. Tomita had a few other minor roles in films, such as The Day After Tomorrow and The Eye, but has taken on more TV roles since then. Tomita also spends a lot of time giving back to the Japanese American community in California. Although she hasn’t seen as much success in the film world, Tomita should be on track for a prosperous year with her philanthropic activities.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_nicole.jpgNicole Scherzinger (1978) is probably best known for her lead singer role in the Pussycat Dolls. This exotic beauty (father is Filipino and mother is Hawaiian Russian) has been singing since she was a teenager, competing in singing contests and eventually landing back-up vocal gigs for various musical groups. With her natural talent, Scherzinger eventually joined the Pussycat Dolls and they became one of the top-selling artists in 2006, despite the initial controversy of them being too provocative and sexy. She left the group in 2010 to pursue individual projects, such as being a contestant of Dancing with the Stars and a judge on America’s Got Talent, as well as being involved with charity work.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/horse_pacquiao.jpgManny Pacquiao (1978) is the first and only eight-division world champion of boxing.

Affectionately known as “Pac-Man,” he is the pride and joy of many Filipino boxing fans around the world. Pacquiao has won many awards over the years, and was long rated as the best pound-for-pound boxer in the world by many sporting news outlets and boxing websites. Not only is he known for boxing, but he is also a politician. He was elected to the House of Representatives in the 15th Congress of the Philippines, representing the province of Sarangani. Like his horse companions, Pacquiao was been blessed with talent, success, and popularity. (end)

Nina Huang can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Cultures, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Plan for second China Gate still in the works

Plan for second China Gate still in the works

By Marino Saito
Northwest Asian Weekly

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The Chinese gate (Photo by Sue Misao/NWAW)

About six years have passed since the first Chinese Gate was built in the Chinatown-International District in Seattle. The Historic China Gate Foundation — a group of business leaders in the International District — came together in 1999 with the hope of completing two traditional Chinese gates to serve as landmarks in Chinatown. Their goal was to improve not only the aesthetic of the area, but also to promote the prominence and contribution of the Chinese community in Seattle. Read the full story

Posted in Features, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

APIs head to Sochi

APIs head to Sochi

By Jason J. Cruz
Northwest Asian Weekly

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Jen Lee (Photo Credit: Tim Hipps, IMCOM Public Affairs)

The Winter Olympics begin on Friday, Feb. 7, in Sochi, Russia. Asian American athletes will be well represented, and here is a list of APIs to look for in the coming weeks.   Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Film festival shares Asian experience

Film festival shares Asian experience

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

The Seattle Asian American Film Festival, previously the Northwest Asian American Film Festival, owes its previous and current existence to local Asian talent.

“I was a loyal fan of the Northwest Asian American Film Festival,” recalls SAAFF co-director Kevin Bang,  “the previous iteration of SAAFF. NWAAFF ran from 2002 to 2007. I wanted the festival back after a six-year hiatus and teamed up with Vanessa [Au] in 2012 to organize and lead the revival of the festival.”

Explains Bang, “The [NWAAFF] began in the 1980s by a team of writers, editors, and photographers from the International Examiner. It also had a three-year run between 1994 and 1996. Wes Kim ran it from 2002 to 02007. I contacted Wes in 2012 to ask, one — why the festival had gone into hiatus, and two — if he knew others who were interested in helping me revive it.”

Kim resigned as director of the festival in 2007 due to time constraints, said Bang, and nobody replaced him.

“The team dissipated as a result. Wes connected me to Vanessa, who also expressed interest in reviving the festival. We met at Café Ladro in Capitol Hill in April 2012 and began organizing SAAFF. We decided to change the name to ‘Seattle’ instead of ‘Northwest’ because the name of the city would resonate better, both locally and nationally.”

Bang was born and raised in Seattle. “My parents are Chinese,” he said, “but lived most of their lives in Vietnam, so growing up, we spoke Cantonese, Vietnamese, and English in the house. He graduated from the University of Washington in 2005, with a Bachelor of Arts in communication – new media. “It was through college that I understood the importance of mass media representation for Asian Americans. There is a large population of Asians and Asian Americans in Seattle, so it’s important to share those stories and cultural experiences.

Bang and Au led the planning, recruiting, and organizing of the festival’s revival and intend to continue moving it forward.

“Our selection committee watched and rated all the films and democratically discussed and picked which one’s would be screened at our festival,” said Bang. “All of us have full-time day jobs or are full-time students, and running a festival is similar to another full-time job, so the effort we get from our team is tremendous and the passion and dedication to the festival is apparent.”

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/movies_someone.jpgOne of the many locally grown talents on display at the festival is actor Eddie Mui, who was born in Hong Kong, but grew up in Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood. He’s one of the leading actors in Someone I Used To Know, directed by Nadine Truong, a sometimes-funny, sometime-dark dramatic account of three childhood friends who reconnect amidst the glitz of Hollywood. They discover how much different they’ve become and how much they’ve stayed the same.

“I feel that we made a film that many people would enjoy watching, with a very strong ensemble cast and it was beautifully shot,” Mui reflects. “Someone I Used To Know is mainly about past and present friendships and how everyone values certain people in their lives that may have come and go. I think our film will make you think about your own friends and what they truly mean to you over the years… and perhaps even change your thoughts about your own self when you are around them. The overall vibe of our picture is kind of like past movies, from The Breakfast Club, Less Than Zero, and The Anniversary Party,” but of course, this film happens to be written, produced, directed by, and mostly starring Asian Americans telling an ‘American’ story that just happens to be taking place on one wacky night in LA… and not Chinatown.”

Asked his favorite films in the festival, Bang singled out Linsanity, directed by Evan Jackson Leong, a documentary study of basketball player Jeremy Lin, who Bang calls “a pioneering figure” for Asian Americans.

“His unprecedented rise from a basketball nobody to become a global sports sensation makes it the feel-good movie of the year,” he said.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_06/movies_raskal.jpgAnother one of Bang’s picks is Raskal Love, directed by Byron Q, which the festival co-director calls the true story of Seattleite Vanna Fut and how he overcame great adversities to pursue dreams in the arts — becoming a pioneering b-boy in Seattle during the 1990s, and then an actor.

“This is a documentary gem from our own backyard,” Bang said.

Asked how the festival will conclude, and about future plans, Bang said, “We’ll do a post-mortem after the festival and talk about our year. We talk about lessons learned and think about ways to improve next year. We foresee needing more volunteers as the festival and team grows.”

They also organized an outdoor summer film series last year during the offseason. (end)

The Seattle Asian American Film Festival runs from Feb. 6 to Feb. 9 at Ark Lodge Cinemas, located at 4816 Rainier Ave. S. in Seattle. For film titles, venues, prices, and show times, visit http://seattleaaff.org/2014/.

Andrew Hamlin can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, At the Movies, Features, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

‘The Bachelor’ couple exchange vows in a ‘grown sexy’ setting

‘The Bachelor’ couple exchange vows in a ‘grown sexy’ setting

By Alia Marsha
Northwest Asian Weekly

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Catherine Giudici and Sean Lowe (Photo by ABC/Todd Wawrychuk)

The Bachelor cast members Sean Lowe and Catherine Giudici are now husband and wife, as witnessed by family and friends and millions of viewers at home. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Celebrate Lunar New Year on both sides of the lake

Celebrate Lunar New Year on both sides of the lake

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The Lunar New Year celebrations start this Friday, Jan. 31, but they don’t end there. The big celebration in the International District on Saturday, Feb. 1 (see story on page 7), will be followed one week later, on Feb. 8 and 9, at Bellevue Connection’s third annual Lunar New Year Celebration at Bellevue Square’s Center Court. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Features 06, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

Ground broken on Hirabayashi Place development

Ground broken on Hirabayashi Place development

By Sue Misao
Northwest Asian Weekly

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Family members of Gordon Hirabayashi, along with business and community partners, broke ground at Hirabayashi Place on Jan. 25. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

About 150 people attended the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hirabayashi Place, a new housing Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Features 06, Vol 33 No 6 | 2/1-2/7Comments (0)

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