Tag Archive | "Vol 33 No 24 | June 7 – June 13"

Festival brings South Asian films to Chinatown/ID

Festival brings South Asian films to Chinatown/ID

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/33_27/movies.jpg

The Tasveer South Asian International Documentary Festival takes place on June 28 and June 29, sponsored by the local Tasveer organization. All films will be shown at the Wing Luke Museum in Seattle’s International District/Chinatown. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 33 No 27 | 6/28-7/4Comments (0)

Maryknoll sister Fallon to receive peacemaker award

Maryknoll sister Fallon to receive peacemaker award

Sister Jean Fallon began her peace and justice work in Japan.

Maryknoll Sister Jean Fallon, a Seattle native who has worked many decades for justice and peace throughout the world, will receive the Sister Christine Mulready Peacemaker Award from Pax Christi Metro New York at its Peacemaker Awards Reception on June 1, at St. Joseph’s Greenwich Village Church in New York. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Cancer Network helps Chinese

Cancer Network helps Chinese

From left, Kathy Yang, Carol Shinn, Yuling Lin, Lisa Lam, Yen Ching, and Debbie Chou sing at the WSCCNA fundraiser.

The Washington State Chinese Cancer Network Association held its 10th anniversary fundraising dinner at Seattle Seaview Restaurant on May 31. About 300 people attended the event, including cancer patients, their family members, and supporters. The network provides support and assistance for cancer patients and survivors, and their families, in the Chinese community. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Hatchery named for Chew

Hatchery named for Chew

Kenneth Chew (Photo courtesy of NOAA)

NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center and the Puget Sound Restoration Fund hosted a ceremony for the opening of the new shellfish restoration hatchery at the Manchester Laboratory in Port Orchard on May 22. The event included a dedication ceremony honoring Kenneth K. Chew, professor emeritus at the University of Washington and shellfish expert, whom the facility will be named after. The new hatchery significantly expands the capabilities in the Pacific Northwest to restore native shellfish populations, improve habitat, increase water quality, advance practices of the aquaculture industry, and minimize impacts of ocean acidification. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

CISC hosts Friendship Dinner

CISC hosts Friendship Dinner

From left: Alaric Bien, Dorothy Wong, Janet Ung, and Linda Louie.

The Chinese Information and Service Center held its 42nd Anniversary Friendship Dinner & Auction on May 31 at Westin Bellevue, where 290 attendees were entertained by lion dancers and participated in live and silent auctions. Nearly $120,000 was raised to fund various programs that help Chinese and other Asian immigrants in the community. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Spring rolls in at Wing Luke

Spring rolls in at Wing Luke

Maiko Winkler-Chin and Bob Hale.

“Celebrating Community Partners” was the theme of the sixth annual Spring Roll auction and celebration at the Wing Luke Museum on May 30. Since the event, $63,000 has been raised for Seattle Chinatown International District Preservation and Development Authority’s community development programs. More is expected as attendees submit matching fund requests to their employers. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

China planning for an extra 2 million babies per year

China planning for an extra 2 million babies per year

By Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) – China is preparing for 2 million extra babies each year as a result of a loosening of its “one child per family” birth limits that will allow more couples to have two children, Chinese health officials said on May 29. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13, World NewsComments (0)

25 years on, protests at Tiananmen barely known to China youth

25 years on, protests at Tiananmen barely known to China youth

By Didi Tang
Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) – Born in 1989, Steve Wang sometimes wonders what happened in his hometown of Beijing that year. But his curiosity about pro-democracy protests and the crackdown on them passes quickly. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13, World NewsComments (0)

Mourning, tight security on anniversary of Tiananmen crackdown

By Gillian Wong
Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) – Yin Min held the ashes of her son and wept, she said, as she marked 25 years since he was killed in the crackdown by Chinese tanks and troops on protests at Tiananmen Square. Outside, guards kept a close eye on her home while police blanketed central Beijing to block any public commemoration of one of the darkest chapters in recent Chinese history. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13, World NewsComments (0)

Shinseki had support of many vet groups until end

Shinseki had support of many vet groups until end

By Associated Press

Eric Shinseki

WASHINGTON (AP) – He’s one of them — a disabled veteran who lost part of his right foot to a mine in Vietnam, a soldier who riled his superiors in the Bush years by telling Congress the United States needed more troops in Iraq than the administration wanted.

That bond is why veterans groups had overwhelmingly endorsed Eric Shinseki as Veterans Affairs secretary in 2009. And it’s part of the reason many continued to support him until his resignation on May 30 in the firestorm surrounding lengthy waits for veterans to get care at VA hospitals and reports that employees had tried to cover them up. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Immigrants fueling a U.S. boom in cricket

By Frank Eltman
Associated Press

EAST ISLIP, New York (AP) – Cricket, the international game of bats and balls that isn’t baseball, is enjoying a surge of popularity in America, with the debut of a national league this spring and higher demand to build “pitches” across the country. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

California city votes to end Sriracha dispute

By Associated Press

IRWINDALE, Calif. (AP) – The fiery fight is apparently over between the makers of a popular hot sauce and a small Southern California city that said its factory’s smells were unbearable. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

S. Korea rescues North Koreans drifting off coast

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) – South Korea has rescued three North Koreans who were drifting off the east coast of South Korea on May 31. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13, World NewsComments (0)

Cheers, jeers, and a lawsuit for Seattle’s $15 wage

By Sue Misao
Northwest Asian Weekly

The Seattle Restaurant Alliance called it “disappointing,” City Councilmember Kshama Sawant called it a “historic victory,” the immigrant-rights group OneAmerica said it was “a critical first step,” and the International Franchise Association is filing a lawsuit against the City of Seattle — all because Seattle City Council unanimously approved the adoption of a $15 per hour minimum wage on June 2. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Hudson Building burgled, vandalized

Hudson Building burgled, vandalized

Photo by Sue Misao/NWAW

The burned-out Hudson Building in the International District continues to suffer indignities as it waits for rehabilitation.

Last month, the owner of one of the building’s businesses — closed since the Dec. 24 fire — reported the burglary of $10,000 to $20,000 worth of herbs being stored in the Yuan Sheng Hang herbal shop. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

SIFF coming to a close

SIFF coming to a close

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

This is the final weekend of the Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF). Here are three preview picks for Asian films showing as the festival winds down. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Life in a country away from home

Life in a country away from home

By Samantha Pak
Northwest Asian Weekly

Sisters
Written by Amy Laizans, Illustrated by Sophie Scahill
Little Steps Publishing, 2013

Jane and her best friend are like most other kids their age living in Australia. They like to play outside in the sun, jump rope together, and read books aloud together. The two girls even help their mothers in the kitchen from time to time.

In fact, the two girls are so close, they are inseparable and consider themselves sisters.

But then one day during lunch at school, a classmate asks Jane if she speaks English. And while she was born in Australia and her best friend — the narrator of “Sisters,” who remains nameless — emigrated from Germany, it is Jane’s language skills that come into question.

This is because Jane is Filipino.

Although “Sisters” is a book geared toward grade school children and written in simple language that young readers can easily understand, it touches on the very complex and complicated issues of race and immigration. The narrator and Jane’s friendship is tested as the latter’s race is put on the spot and the former — and readers as well — question why it should even matter.

“Sisters” is a story about what it means to be a real friend and how to look beyond what a person looks like before judging them. This is a lesson that people are never too young — or old — to learn. I love how Laizans tackles the issue head-on, while making sure her readers understand the message.

In addition to the story, “Sisters” is beautifully illustrated with fun pictures in bright colors that bring Jane and her best friend’s adventures to life. From blowing giant bubble gum bubbles to exploring in the woods, Scahill’s computer-generated images will have young readers wishing they could join in on the fun with the two girls.

Gilded
By Christina Farley
Skyscrape, 2014

A few years after her mother dies, 16-year-old Jae Hwa and her father move from their Los Angeles home to Seoul, South Korea.

Having been uprooted from the only home she has ever known, Jae works to fit in with her new classmates and figure out why her paternal grandfather seems to dislike her so much.

Just as she begins to make friends at her new school, Jae discovers why her grandfather has been so adamant in wanting to send her back to the United States. For centuries, Haemosu, a Korean demi-god, has been stealing the souls of the oldest daughter from each generation in her family. And as long as she’s in Korea, she’s next.

A black belt in tae kwon do and highly skilled in Korean archery, Jae is confident her skills will be enough to defeat Haemosu. She quickly finds out how wrong she is and learns the ancient art of metamorphism and uses her growing power in the Spirit World.

While Jae receives help from multiple fronts, she is hesitant to accept it — partly out of a fierce independence streak and partly out of wanting to keep her family and friends safe. Jae is the furthest thing from a wilting wallflower, and her will to fight Haemosu takes both the demi-god and herself by surprise. In addition, Jae’s skills make her a worthy opponent of Haemosu’s powers, as well as a strong figure for young people to look up to.

“Gilded” may be a story filled with magic, action, and adventure, but it is also the story of a family trying to find their way back to each other. From estranged siblings and complicated parent-child relationships, Farley shows that no matter what, in the end, it all comes down to family.

City of Tranquil Light
By Bo Caldwell
Henry Holt and Company, 2010

The year is 1906. At the age of 21, Will Kiehn is living quite the ordinary life, seemingly destined to become a humble farmer in the Midwest like his father and older siblings. But when a family friend pays a visit with stories of his missionary work in the North China Plain, Will feels a call from God to do the same.

While there, he meets Katherine, a nurse dedicated to service as well. The two marry a couple years later.

“Tranquil Light” alternates between Will and Katherine’s points of view and is the story of an initially young couple as they dedicate themselves to doing God’s work and helping others in a country that neither of the characters knew much about. And it’s not easy — over the decades, they face personal loss, civil war, famine, widespread illness, and more.

Enduring all the fear, pain, dangers, and struggles that come with missionary work in a rural village, readers will be inspired to see how strong Will and Katherine are and how unshakeable their faith in God is. It is nothing less than admirable to see how devoted they are. As someone who is not super religious, I found this to be one of the most touching and inspirational parts of “Tranquil Light.”

I also enjoyed reading a story in which the American characters are the ones traveling to a foreign country and have to learn how to adapt. Will and Katherine’s initial observations and experiences regarding Chinese customs and traditions are entertaining, as they are often thrown into situations in which they have no clue what to do or how to act. They are definitely fish out of water, but their efforts to learn all they can endears them to the Chinese people, as well as readers. (end)

Samantha Pak can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (1)

PICTORIAL: Women of the Century

PICTORIAL: Women of the Century

The Women’s University Club of Seattle presented its annual Brava! Awards on May 16, honoring women in the greater Seattle area who have made a positive, enduring difference in the community and beyond. This year, in celebration of the club’s centennial, members nominated “Women of the Century.” Read the full story

Posted in Pictorials, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

The Asian Hall of Fame

The Asian Hall of Fame

Former Ambassador Gary Locke, standing, introduces Norman Mineta, seated in the center. The other Hall of Fame inductees are, from left, Manu Tuiasosopo, Grace Park, and Nathan Adrian. Hall of Fame President Karen Wong is seated on the right. (Photo by Rebecca Ip/SCP)

The Asian Hall of Fame honored four Asian Americans at its annual event at the Fairmont Olympic in Seattle on May 31. Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

Korean adoptees find culture at festival

Korean adoptees find culture at festival

By Jamie Sun
Northwest Asian Weekly

Kids decorated flags at the festival. (Photo by Jamie Sun/NWAW)

On May 31, more than 100 people gathered at South Bellevue Community Center to celebrate the annual Korean Culture Festival, hosted by the Korean Adoptee Family Foundation (KORAFF). Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 33 No 24 | 6/7-6/13Comments (0)

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