Tag Archive | "Vol 32 No 44 | October 26 – November 1"

Wedding celebrated with tradition

Wedding celebrated with tradition

Dennis Su, Millie Su, Mira Su Clutter, Travis Clutter, Ada Clutter, and Bob Hawk enjoy the wedding celebration. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Newlyweds Mira Su Clutter and Travis Clutter partake in a traditional Chinese tea ceremony with their parents. Family friend Evelyn Wong serves the tea. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

The marriage celebration for Mira Su Clutter and Travis Clutter on Oct. 20 included a traditional Chinese tea ceremony, in which the bride and groom serve tea to their loved ones, who in turn present the couple red envelopes full of “lucky money.” Here, the newlyweds, in traditional Chinese wedding dress, serve tea to the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Su. More than 200 guests attended the celebration, which was held at the Golf Course at Newcastle, Wash. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

Nepal festival celebrates virtues, culture

Nepal festival celebrates virtues, culture

Alumni from the program “Nepali School for Children” sang the Nepali National Anthem, “Saiyau Thunga” as well as “The Star-Spangled Banner” to open the event. (Photo by Yugesh Iwaram)

The biggest festival in Nepal, called Dashai, began its 15-day celebration with a festive event at the Shoreline Conference Center on Oct. 5. Guests included Mayor Mike McGinn, Deputy Mayor Darryl Smith, Mr. Habib Habib, cochair of the Washington State and India Trade Relations Action Committee (WASITRAC), and Debadutta Dash, cochair of WASITRAC and president of ACRS. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

Future journalist is crowned Miss Teen USA

Future journalist is crowned Miss Teen USA

Starla Sampaco

The winner of Miss Washington Teen USA 2014 is Filipino American Starla Sampaco of Bellevue. Miss Sampaco is a freshman at the University of Washington, where she is working toward a degree in journalism, with the hopes of becoming a broadcast journalist. She is currently the senior host of a Seattle youth media show called “What’s Good, 206?” which features inspirational people who make a positive impact in our community.

This year’s pageant had 19 judges, including Superbowl XXXVI champ lawyer Milloy, founder and CEO Dan Caldwell, and NBCUniversal executive Bruno Singh. The teens were judged on three areas of the competition: interviews, evening gowns, and swimwear. The two-day event was held at Highline Performing Arts Center in Burien on Oct. 18 and 19.

This was Miss Sampaco’s third try for the crown. Last year, she was first runner-up. Next summer, she will go to Miss Teen USA. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

Dr. Jai Jun Byeon receives Award

Dr. Jai Jun Byeon receives Award

Dr. Jai Jun Byeon

Cornerstone Medical Services CEO and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jai Jun Byeon will be awarded the 2013 Molina Healthcare Champion award at the Renton Pavilion Event Center on Oct. 24. Dr. Byeon will receive a $1,000 grant to donate to any nonprofit organization. He has selected Cornerstone Medical Services to receive this award. Dr. Byeon is one of seven winners selected from 85 nominees. As a volunteer for CMS, he has donated over 4,000 hours in free medical services to more than a thousand uninsured families. Dr. Byeon also hosts the weekly health education show on Radio Hankook, the Korean language radio in Washington state. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

Life terms sought for Khmer two

Life terms sought for Khmer two

By Justine Drennan and Sopheng Cheang
The Associated Press

Nuon Chea (AP Photo)

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Prosecutors at Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge tribunal requested life imprisonment for two of the regime’s surviving leaders, issuing an emotional appeal for justice for the millions who died or suffered through the group’s reign of terror nearly 40 years ago. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1, World NewsComments (0)

Super smog hits north China city; flights canceled

Super smog hits north China city; flights canceled

By Louise Watt
The Associated Press

A woman wearing a mask walks through a street covered by dense smog in Harbin, northern China, Monday, Oct. 21. Visibility shrank to less than half a football field and small-particle pollution soared to a record 40 times higher than an international safety standard in one northern Chinese city as the region entered its high-smog season. (Photo by Kyodo News/AP)

BEIJING (AP) — Visibility shrank to less than half a football field and small-particle pollution soared to a record 40 times higher than an international safety standard in one northern Chinese city as the region entered its high-smog season. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1, World NewsComments (1)

In aging China, old woman sues children for care

In aging China, old woman sues children for care

By Kristen Gelineau
The Associated Press

Zhang Zefang, a 94-year-old woman who sued her own children for not taking care of her, sits on her bed in her house in Fusheng Village, east of Chongqing City, China on March 19, 2013. Zhang is among a growing group of elderly Chinese who have resorted to suing their children in a desperate bid for care. (Photo by Eugene Hoshiko/AP)

FUSHENG, China (AP) — The daughter-in-law smashes the cockroach under her foot and rolls open the rusted metal doors to the garage. Light spills onto a small figure huddled on a straw mattress in a dank room. A curious face peers out. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1, World NewsComments (0)

Inside ‘Pacific Rim’ game

Inside ‘Pacific Rim’ game

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

“Pacific Rim” may be an American movie with a Mexican director using Japanese ideas, but the accompanying video game comes direct from a Japanese company, Yuke’s Co. Ltd. Naoto Ueno, head designer of the game, took some questions over email. Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Features, Profiles, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

“Marine Boy: The Complete First Season”

“Marine Boy: The Complete First Season”

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

“There’s ‘Marine Boy,’” said Mom, poring over the TV listings. “You want to watch ‘Marine Boy’?”

That was Mom, circa 1975. I was seven. Or it could have been circa 1978. I was 10. “Marine Boy,” originally created as “Kaitei Shōnen Marin” (“Undersea Boy Marine”) for Japanese kids in the 60s and early 70s, played local Seattle television for seemingly ever. Then again, I was a kid. And I didn’t even know it was Japanese. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (1)

“Vampire” decidedly anti-”Twilighty”

“Vampire” decidedly anti-”Twilighty”

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

“Vampire,” from the celebrated Japanese director Shunji Iwai, takes to the opposite extreme in artistry. Iwai, in his first English-language film, wants to explore vampire nature, but he wants to do it in an anti-“Twilight” style. Tough, gritty, bloody, and smeary. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

UW professor devises reform in Chinese hukou system

UW professor devises reform in Chinese hukou system

By Imana Gunawan
Northwest Asian Weekly

UW geography professor Kam Wing Chan

At the heart of “the world’s factory” are 230 million rural migrants in China living below the poverty line. Currently, a University of Washington professor is trying to help them move to the cities, acquire equal opportunities and reform the Chinese national or even global economy.

Kam Wing Chan, geography professor at the UW, has been studying the Chinese hukou system for more than 30 years. The hukou, established in 1958 to control Chinese residents’ movements from rural to urban areas, is a record in the household registration system required by law in the People’s Republic of China. If rural residents wish to move the urban areas, they must obtain permission from the police and go through the relevant bureaucracies, which would give them rights to benefits such as unemployment, retirement, and even education in the city. Chan is looking for ways to reform the hukou system. Read the full story

Posted in Features, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

BLOG: McGinn vs. Murray. Who should we endorse?

BLOG: McGinn vs. Murray. Who should we endorse?

By Assunta Ng

Mayor Mike McGinn, left, and Sen. Ed Murray at the API forum held at the ACRS. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

It is not easy to choose the next Seattle mayor. I can tell you why you should vote for Mayor Mike McGinn. I could also give you reasons why you should go with Sen. Ed Murray. However, I do have concerns with both candidates.

After watching three mayoral forums, I have to conclude that Mayor Mike McGinn, the earlier “misbehaved schoolboy” who liked to interrupt his opponents, has toned down his behavior, and is now quite a charmer. He is a skilled debater, while Murray couldn’t even remember the moderator’s question at times.

But the issue is this: Are we voting for a debater, or a leader who can govern the City of Seattle?

What makes the Seattle mayoral race compelling is that both McGinn and Murray have cultivated close ties with the community. Both are liberals and have track records in civil rights. McGinn is strong in the grass-root level with supporters including Frank Irigon, the late Kip Tokuda, and Ruth Woo. Murray is also well connected to the community, with support from Seattle City Council member Bruce Harrell, Martha Choe, and former King County Executive Ron Sims, who has a strong influence in both mainstream and people of color communities.

Pros and cons for voting McGinn

McGinn has an advantage over Murray, since he holds the helm of the city budget. Through the city’s funding, he has generously rewarded many nonprofit organizations led by leaders who have supported him. McGinn has also created an ethnic media initiative by encouraging city departments to engage with minority media. Even though I am a member of ethnic media myself, this strategy is a bit self-serving in an election year. He knew that he wouldn’t get the support of the mainstream media, so he turned his focus to ethnic press instead.

McGinn is known to be abrasive. “I’d rather get things done” than “to get along with people,” McGinn said at the Seattle Rotary Club’s forum at the Grand Hyatt Hotel on Oct. 16. His words reveal his combative nature as a politician. He couldn’t care less that he needs to work with those people afterwards.

Five city council members have endorsed Murray, meaning McGinn doesn’t play well with his peers. He publicly insulted former governor Christine Gregoire, and avoided talking to her in public. He was defiant toward the Dept. of Justice on police reform, resulting in the city’s humiliation. In the end, even the police guild turned its back on the mayor, and endorsed Murray instead.

Can McGinn afford to shoot everyone down that he perceives as not playing his way, and still run the city effectively?

Why and why not for Murray

Asian American leaders who supported McGinn have been unhappy with Murray’s lack of presence in the community. Showing up counts a great deal to the Asian community. McGinn has been diligent since last year, attending numerous Asian events, big and small.

Last March, both Murray and McGinn were present at the Wing Luke Museum’s gala. One Asian guest said, “Murray looked pathetic.”

As both candidates were making their rounds in the audience, fans gathered around McGinn; Murray knew few people. No one volunteered to introduce Murray to the other prominent community leaders.

At the API forum held at the Asian Counseling and Referral Service Center on Oct. 11, some Asian Americans complained about Murray being ill at ease, as well as his vague answers.

Over the past years, McGinn has alienated many. Murray has strategically picked up McGinn’s foes one by one, adding to his endorsement list. Murray’s goal is to build coalitions, which will be helpful if he becomes our next mayor.

Murray’s new supporters don’t necessarily believe in Murray, they just reject McGinn’s leadership. Their aim is to get rid of McGinn.

Murray’s words struck me when he said he understands that the “blame game” is unhealthy for the city.

“I will take responsibility” for things not going right, Murray said during the Seattle Rotary club’s debate.

The perfect candidate?

If you are searching for our Seattle mayoral endorsement, you won’t find it. For valid reasons, we decided not to.

Both candidates have merits and flaws. Vote for McGinn another four years if you appreciate his support of the Asian community. Vote for Murray if you are tired of McGinn’s combative manner and noncollaborative style of leadership, and you want a fresh start for the city.

There is no such thing as a perfect candidate. Someone told me that they are sitting out this election because they don’t feel connected to either McGinn or Murray. That’s the worst kind of protest. When you don’t vote, you are giving up your rights, evading responsibilities, and most important, diminishing the power of the Asian vote.

I know who to vote for. (end)

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (1)

Asian candidates dot electoral landscape

Asian candidates dot electoral landscape

By Sue Misao
Northwest Asian Weekly

Ten API candidates remain on the ballot for King County in contested races in the Nov. 5 general election. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

Top Contributor: Bjong Wolf Yeigh — New UW chancellor has high ambitions

Top Contributor: Bjong Wolf Yeigh — New UW chancellor has high ambitions

By Imana Gunawan
Northwest Asian Weekly

Bjong Wolf Yeigh (Photo from UW of Bothell)

University of Washington Bothell’s new chancellor Bjong Wolf Yeigh has ambitions for both his new institution and for its students, the majority of whom identify with underrepresented minority groups.

“In the end, when we’re successful with all the things that we’re doing, I would like to see University of Washington Bothell be the university of choice for our stakeholders — that students want to come here because this is their first choice institution,” he said. “We’re already beginning to see that.” Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Education, Profiles, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

Lee wants 6th term — City’s first mayor/council member of color

Lee wants 6th term — City’s first mayor/council member of color

By Zachariah Bryan
Northwest Asian Weekly

Conrad Lee (Photo from Conrad Lee campaign)

Bellevue Mayor Conrad Lee has been on the city council for 20 years.

Put another way, that’s over 7,300 days, or over 175,000 hours, or over 1 million minutes.

To say the least, Lee has put in a lot of time in his job, and now he’s running for reelection.

His motto? “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

“We have to keep up with the growth, we have to manage it right, and to do it right we need a longtime councilmember with proven experience,” said Lee. “In my own life — I’m not a young chick — I think I’ve achieved a certain degree of success and stability. I bring wisdom.”

Long disregarded as a suburb for rich white people, Bellevue has throughout the past 20 years become a bustling center of diversity and entrepreneurism. More than 30 percent of the population is foreign born, and more than 40 percent are ethnic minorities. And big businesses such as Coinstar, Expedia, ITEX, Sierra Entertainment, T-Mobile, and Vulcan have their headquarters in Bellevue. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Profiles, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

BLOG: Watch out for gutsy Asian female politicians

BLOG: Watch out for gutsy Asian female politicians

By Assunta Ng

Kshama Sawant at the API forum. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Who is Kshama Sawant? “Wow” was my reaction when I first saw her at the API forum. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (2)

EDITORIAL: You’re in control: Vote, run, be heard

EDITORIAL: You’re in control: Vote, run, be heard

If politics, as it’s been said, is the art of controlling your environment, then voting is the easiest way to exert that control. We vote for candidates who will use their position and power to give us what we want — good schools for our children, efficient transportation, safe neighborhoods, care for our elders, and more. If, after voting, we are still unsatisfied, it might just be time to run for office.

We commend the local Asian Americans who have risen to the challenge of public service, running for seats on city and county councils and school boards throughout King County. Some have been involved in local politics for years, but others — such as Benson Wong, who is running for city council in Mercer Island, and My-Linh Thai, running for Bellevue School Board Director, District 5 — are stepping into the political arena for the first time.

They give a voice to the growing API community by addressing concerns of importance — not just to Asian Americans, but to all residents who want to live in an environment of respectful inclusiveness. It helps, as one candidate said, to have representatives in office who understand the different cultures living alongside each other. This is what candidates of color can provide.

Even candidates with what may be considered “radical” points of view, with seemingly little chance of being elected, deserve your vote if you passionately agree with them. If they lose, those individual votes still add up and bring validity to their viewpoints. This is how “radical” becomes “mainstream.” Your vote is your voice.

Nearly 300,000 Asian/Pacific Islanders live in King County. About a dozen of them are running for office. It is up to the rest of the API community to vote — for them if you like them, against them if you don’t. Be heard. (end)

Posted in Editorials, Vol 32 No 44 | 10/26-11/1Comments (0)

DOWNLOADS

NWAW MEDIA KIT 2014





Weekly E-Newsletter

READ NWAW ONLINE!

Follow our tweets

Do you like us?

Photos on flickr