Tag Archive | "Vol 32 No 30 | July 20 – July 26"

Two ID buildings receive 4Culture restoration grants

Two ID buildings receive 4Culture restoration grants

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The Panama Hotel will receive $22,412 to restore its exterior. (Photo from 4Culture)

The 4Culture Board recently awarded $258,006 to support the rehabilitation of 19 local landmarks around King County through the new Landmarks Capital program, including two landmarks in the International District: The Hip Sing Building and the Panama Hotel. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Arun Rath to host NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered

Arun Rath to host NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered

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Arun Rath

Indian-American Journalist Arun Rath will become the new host of the NPR newsmagazine Weekend All Things Considered beginning in late September, when the Saturday and Sunday edition moves its broadcast to the West Coast.

Rath has had a distinguished career in public media as a reporter, producer, and editor, most recently as a senior reporter for the PBS series Frontline and The World on WGBH Boston. He has also worked for several NPR and public radio programs.

Rath began his journalism career as an NPR intern at Talk of the Nation, eventually joining the staff and becoming the show’s director after working on several NPR News programs during the 1990s. In 2000, he became senior producer for NPR’s On the Media, produced by WNYC, where he was part of a team that tripled its audience and won a Peabody Award. He spent 2005 as senior editor at the culture and arts show Studio 360.

Rath moved to television in 2005 to report and manage radio partnerships for Frontline. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Daphne Kwok joins AARP as Vice President

Daphne Kwok joins AARP as Vice President

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Daphne Kwok

AARP has appointed Daphne Kwok as the new Vice President, Multicultural Markets and Engagement effective July 8. Daphne will lead AARP’s outreach efforts toward Asian Americans.

“Daphne brings with her an extensive history of community activism and leadership in the Asian American and Pacific Islander American communities,” said Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez, AARP’s Executive Vice President, Multicultural Markets and Engagement. “We are very excited to have her return to Washington, DC and become part of our team.” Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (1)

Civil rights group asks feds to investigate Kentucky school district

By Staff
The Associated Press

RUSSELL, Ky. (AP) — A civil rights organization has asked a pair of federal agencies to investigate the Russell Independent Schools in eastern Kentucky over allegations that a 14-year-old Asian-American student has been repeatedly harassed. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Courts will treat international passengers differently in lawsuits

Courts will treat international passengers differently in lawsuits

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Frank Pitre

By Paul Elias
The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — When the courts have to figure compensation for people aboard Asiana Airlines Flight 214, the potential payouts will probably be vastly different for Americans and passengers from other countries, even if they were seated side by side as the jetliner crash-landed. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Racially insensitive remarks heat up ‘Big Brother’

Racially insensitive remarks heat up ‘Big Brother’

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GinaMarie Zimmerman

By David Bauder
AP Television Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Racially insensitive language hurt some cast members’ reputations in the CBS game “Big Brother,” but it may not have been bad for television ratings. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Accused of rape, China general’s son plays victim

Accused of rape, China general’s son plays victim

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Li Tianyi

By Gillian Wong
The Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) — Lawyers of a well-known Chinese general’s son accused of taking part in a gang rape are waging a rare, Western-style war of words against his critics in a reflection of the growing perception that public opinion counts. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26, World NewsComments (0)

Cambodian opposition leader pardoned ahead of vote

Cambodian opposition leader pardoned ahead of vote

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Prime Minister Hun Sen

By Sophen Cheang
The Associated Press

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen engineered a pardon for his most prominent rival July 12, clearing the way for the self-exiled politician to return home and campaign in this month’s general election. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26, World NewsComments (2)

Myanmar signs trust-building pact with rebels

By Staff
The Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar’s government has signed an agreement with a major ethnic rebel group to build mutual trust in an effort to defuse recent tensions between the armies from the two sides, state-run media reported July 13. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26, World NewsComments (0)

Seattle directs contractors to advertise in ethnic media

By Asha DuMonthier
New America Media

Seattle may be the first in the nation to require its contractors to include ethnic media in their community outreach plans, city officials say. The move boosts the visibility of ethnic media, but some of those news outlets say it is unclear if it will result in more ad dollars. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (2)

Japan beats US to win gold at Softball World Cup

Japan beats US to win gold at Softball World Cup

By Murray Evans
The Associated Press

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Team Japan also took gold at the Youth Softball World Cup. (Photo from Softball Japan)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Yuki Hayashi had two hits from four at bats with three RBIs as Japan beat the United States 6-3 on July 14 to win the gold medal in the eighth World Cup of Softball. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Primary election ballots arrive this week

Ballots and voters’ pamphlets for the Aug. 6 primary election will arrive in mailboxes throughout King County this week as King County Elections will mail nearly 1.2 million ballots on July 17. Voters’ pamphlets are mailed separately by bulk mail and may arrive on a different day than ballots. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Robots on the ‘Pacific Rim’

Robots on the ‘Pacific Rim’

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

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Giant monsters. Giant robots. Giant monsters fighting giant robots. If the underlying principles of “Pacific Rim” sound familiar to you from Japanese anime, film, and television, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Mexican director Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Hellboy) favors the horror and science fiction genres. For his latest film, he specializes in spectacle.  And he’s pulled out some of his favorite ideas from exactly the aforementioned.

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/32_30/movies_pacificrim.jpgPacific Rim’s main characters pilot “Jaegers,” giant robots the size of skyscrapers with an impressive, apparently endless array of weapons. The robots fight “Kaiju,” giant monsters emerging (as the film starts) one by one from a fissure deep beneath the ocean.

In real life, “Kaiju” is a Japanese word literally meaning “strange beast” but usually referring to the giant monsters popularized by Inshiro Honda’s film “Godzilla,” released originally in 1954. Often portrayed through “suitmation” — rubber costumes worn by stuntmen who cavorted through, and often stomped on, scale-model representations of Tokyo and elsewhere — Godzilla spawned 28 films, a multimedia empire, and a slew of complimentary, sometimes competing “kaiju.”

The giant robot “mecha” traces its origins back to 1956, when Mitsuteru Yokoyama first published the manga “Tetsujin 28-gō,” detailing a robot operated remotely by a young boy. Go Nagai’s “Mazinger Z” manga, first published in 1972, made the decisive change of placing young pilots actually inside the giant robots, thus contrasting human youth and physical weakness with mechanical might. Both manga became successful anime series, and it’s been sky-high (and beyond, into deep space) for mecha ever since.

Mecha have fought kaiju onscreen before, notably in 1973’s “Godzilla vs. Megalon,” which featured a giant robot called Jet Jaguar wrestling with Godzilla. But del Toro, armed with state-of-the-art CGI special effects, isn’t stopping at one or two robots, monsters, or fights.

The film begins partway thorough a long, costly, demoralizing battle against the kaiju, which has united the entire Earth against the monsters, but has depleted resources, killed millions, and left the remaining population in jeopardy. Stacker Pentecost, played by English actor Idris Elba, leads a rear-guard action as the Jaeger program winds down.

Pentecost seeks out Raleigh Beckett (played by Charlie Hunnam), a former Jaeger pilot who suffered the loss of his brother, and copilot, in combat. (Jaegers require two pilots to operate, a feature seen in some mecha anime, for example 2006’s “Zegapain.”) He wants Raleigh back in the mecha saddle, but picking a new copilot proves difficult.

The most obvious match is Pentecost’s underling Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi). She scores highly on all the tests, and shows a rapport with Raleigh. But Pentecost is reluctant to put her into combat, for his own private reasons. Then, some disturbing news about the kaiju forces his hand, and “Pacific Rim” heats up.

The obligatory combat sequences obligingly carry on long and thunderous, with nods to the source material such as seafaring craft tossed around like bathtub toys, and a certain bobble to the long-necked kaiju, a nod to the days when they were stuntmen in suits. The mecha, which after all have a stronger tradition in anime than in live-action fare, move more fluidly.

A few fights go on a little too long, and a lengthy subplot about Mako Mori’s background could have been trimmed for a sleeker running time. On the whole, though, del Toro gets what he wants: An epic, knock-down drag-out battle royal with just enough human interest for balance. For more bobble, wobble, and silliness, though, check out what came before. (end)

“Pacific Rim” opens Friday, July 12 at various theatres.  Check local listings for venues, showtimes, prices, and parking.

Andrew Hamlin can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (1)

PICTORIAL: Dragon Fest 2013

PICTORIAL: Dragon Fest 2013

Photos by George Liu/NWAW

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Over 25,000 people visited the International District during Dragon Fest 2013, according to preliminary counts, many for the first time ever.

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McDonald’s returned as presenting sponsor for the 2013 Dragon Fest.

 

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McDonald’s also provided kid-friendly games and shows.

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Approximately 100 volunteers staffed information booths and took surveys to ensure the event ran smoothly.

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Lawrence Pang (left) and Van Vong (right) joined in the festivities.

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Activities ranged from games and crafts to dances and tai chi.

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Of the dozens of cosplayers that competed, only four received prizes.

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The International Dance Party debuted at the 2013 festival.

 

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Groups from the Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Vietnamese, Indian, Pacific Islander, and other communities performed.

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Kid-friendly entertainment included games, arts and crafts, and multiple kid-aimed performances.

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Sakura Con cosplayers visited the International District once again, showing off their various costumes.

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Cosplayers walked across the main stage, striking poses in hopes of winning the cosplay contest.

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People of all ages attended the festival, some to enjoy the programing and some to perform.

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Volunteers were deployed to ensure that the ID remained tidy and litter free.

 

Posted in Community News, Features, Pictorials, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

COMMENTARY: Senate hog wild over Chinese bid for Smithfield Pork

COMMENTARY: Senate hog wild over Chinese bid for Smithfield Pork

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George Koo

By George Koo
New America Media

When Shuanghui, China’s largest pork producer, made an offer to buy Smithfield, it should have been a straightforward business transaction. Smithfield is America’s largest pork producer. By acquiring Smithfield, Shuanghui would be positioned to fill China’s rising demand for more pork. Read the full story

Posted in Commentaries, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (1)

BLOG: What a July it’s been

BLOG: What a July it’s been

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Kip Tokuda

Remembering Kippy

Remembering Kip Tokuda, two special moments will always carry with me, one light and the other serious. The former state representative passed away last Saturday while fishing on Whidbey Island.   Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (0)

Dragon Fest a boon to families, businesses

Dragon Fest a boon to families, businesses

By Charles Lam
Northwest Asian Weekly

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During the festival, Mayor McGinn (center left) debuted the first of 30 new bilingual street signs to be put up across the neighborhood. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

The International District is open for business.

That’s what over 25,000 people attending the International District’s Dragon Fest 2013 last weekend learned as vendors lined the streets and restaurants opened their doors for the neighborhood’s annual summer festival. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Profiles, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (2)

Asian America at the Capitol Hill Block Party

Asian America at the Capitol Hill Block Party

By Charles Lam
Northwest Asian Weekly

Each year in July, the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce closes off a portion of the neighborhood to host the Read the full story

Posted in Column: Pop Culture, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (1)

Kip Tokuda, community activist, passes away at 66

Kip Tokuda, community activist, passes away at 66

By Staff
Northwest Asian Weekly

Kip Tokuda

Kip Tokuda, a former four-term state representative from the 37th district and community activist who founded the Asian Community Leadership Foundation (ACLF), was past president of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), and served on the Mayor’s Seattle Police Department 20/20 initiative passed away on July 13. He was 66. Read the full story

Posted in Obituaries, Vol 32 No 30 | 7/20-7/26Comments (1)

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