Tag Archive | "Vol 31 No 7 | February 11 – February 17"

Japanese American veterans honored in Seattle with Congressional Gold Medal

Japanese American veterans honored in Seattle with Congressional Gold Medal

Screencap of the ceremony, from Seattle Channel

On Jan. 14, more than 1,100 people came together to celebrate presentation of the Congressional Gold Medal to Japanese American veterans of the 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team, and Military Intelligence Service (MIS) in Meany Hall on the University of Washington campus. The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest award that can be bestowed by the United States Congress. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Tacoma’s Chi Choi among five honored with Transforming Lives Award

Tacoma’s Chi Choi among five honored with Transforming Lives Award

Chi Choi

The Trustrees Assocation of Community and Technical Colleges (TACTC)’s Transforming Lives Awards recognize current and former students whose lives were transformed by attending a Washington state community or technical college.

The recent awardees are Lisa Cook, from Bellingham Technical College, Cristian Ramon, from Big Bend Community College, Margaret Debevec, from Centralia College, Chi Choi, from Tacoma Community College, and Patricia Denga, from Whatcom Community College.

After battling drug addiction and a 14-month stint in the Washington State Penitentiary System, Choi turned his life around with the help of his mother. He enrolled in Tacoma Community College and, as he says, “never looked back.”

In additional to his volunteer work, Choi is now on his way to earning his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Shoreline Community College signs pact with Taiwan Academy

Shoreline Community College signs pact with Taiwan Academy

Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert (left) and Andy Chin, Director General of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Seattle, swap documents as they sign a letter of intent between the college and Taiwan Academy. (Photo from shoreline.edu)

On Jan. 31, Shoreline Community College President Lee Lambert and Andy Chin, director general of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Seattle, signed a letter of intent — a partnership agreement. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

ECOA greets Korean Management Association delegates at conference

ECOA greets Korean Management Association delegates at conference

Pictured is Keith T. Darcy, executive director of the Ethics and Compliance Officer Association (ECOA), with members of the Korean delegation.

A delegation of executives from the Korean Management Association met at the Ethics and Compliance Officer Association’s 19th Annual Ethics and Compliance conference late last year in Bellevue. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

A survivor’s story (plus, cute kids!)

A survivor’s story (plus, cute kids!)

The Layup Drill — a NEW monthly column about APIs in sports

By Jason Cruz
Northwest Asian Weekly

Welcome to the third edition of The Layup Drill! This month, we have a survivor, kid champs, and the NBA celebrating Chinese New Year. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Short stories about APIs — NWAW’s monthly must-reads

Short stories about APIs — NWAW’s monthly must-reads

By Samantha Pak
Northwest Asian Weekly

“The Wavering of Haruhi Suzumiya”
By Nagaru Tanigawa
Little, Brown and Company, 2011

In this latest installment of the Haruhi Suzumiya series, we join Haruhi, Kyon, and the rest of the S.O.S. Brigade (“Save the World By Overloading It With Fun Harhui Suzumiya”) in a new set of misadventures.

Well, not all of them are new — a few of the events have been mentioned throughout the previous books. But up to this point, we’ve yet to know how the North High cultural festival went (“Live Alive”), who killed whom during the winter ski trip murder mystery (“Where Did the Cat Go?”), or how well Kyon edited the Brigade’s cultural festival movie (“The Adventures of Mikuru Asahina Episode 00”).

Until now, that is.

For fans of the series, “Wavering” is a real treat as we finally see what happens in regard to the events we’ve been reading about in the last five books. And because Haruhi is involved, something interesting always occurs. The cultural festival ends with a musical twist, Kyon’s cat Shamisen plays an important role in the murder mystery, and the Brigade film contains as many discontinuities as there are thoughts in Haruhi’s mind. Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (1)

BLOG: An expensive lunch with Obama

On Feb. 17, President Obama will fund raise at the Westin Bellevue. Count me out. I don’t have the resources to pay $1,000. Attendance is $5,000 per family representative (it includes a photo with the President) and $1,000 for each additional family member. This means a cost of $6,000 for two people from one household and $7,000 for three.
Mind you, the $1,000 is for lunch, not dinner. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

BLOG: Absorbing feedback

“Why are you helping the Chinese government?” asked a Taiwanese immigrant reader who complained that we wrote about the Chinese consul general sending a letter to the Seattle City Council asking them not to see Shen Yun, a show organized by Falun Gong, a group that opposes the Chinese government. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

COMMENTARY: Sen. Paull Shin announces stance on Marriage Equality Act

COMMENTARY: Sen. Paull Shin announces stance on Marriage Equality Act

Sen. Paull Shin

By Sen. Paull Shin
For Northwest Asian Weekly

Editor’s note: Sen. Paull Shin issued the following statement on his vote on Senate Bill 6239 to allow same-sex marriage.

I want to thank you for your understanding during these past weeks as I considered my vote on Senate Bill 6239 concerning marriage equality. My office has received hundreds of phone calls, e-mails, and letters, and I know that this is a very important issue to many of you in the 21st district. As your senator, there is no question that you deserve to know the reasoning behind my vote on this bill. Read the full story

Posted in Commentaries, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

COMMENTARY: Do elite colleges in the nation discriminate against Asians?

COMMENTARY: Do elite colleges in the nation discriminate against Asians?

Mark Lee

By Mark Lee
Northwest Asian Weekly

January 16 was a federal holiday celebrating the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr.  King’s legacy upholds the principle that all people, regardless of race or creed, should be treated as equals. In a democratic society, education should function as the great equalizer. Read the full story

Posted in Commentaries, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Old Seattle artfully captured by Issei painters

Old Seattle artfully captured by Issei painters

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

The “Painting Seattle” exhibit (Photos by Wendi Dunlap/Beacon Hill Blog)

As part of the Seattle Asian Art Museum’s “Painting Seattle” exhibit, canvases by Kamekichi Tokita occupy one showroom wall. Works from Kenjiro Nomura are exhibited on the opposite wall. The two men, friends, co-workers, and Japanese American Issei chroniclers of their hometown, shared much but also diverged as they went about leaving their legacies. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Features, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Diversity Makes a Difference — Part 1

Diversity Makes a Difference — Part 1

Compiled by Staff
Northwest Asian Weekly

Northwest Asian Weekly’s Diversity Makes a Difference scholarship program celebrates young people who are committed to reaching out across cultural lines. Students are nominated by their school as being champions of diversity. From among those students, a judging panel will choose five winners who will receive $1,000 scholarships and a number of finalists who will receive $200 scholarships. Read the full story

Posted in Education, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Aficionados to display ping pong wizardry at Table Tennis Showcase

Aficionados to display ping pong wizardry at Table Tennis Showcase

By James Tabafunda
Northwest Asian Weekly

Billy Ding (Photo by James Tabafunda/NWAW)

It’s all about spinning a ball that weighs less than an ounce and making sky-high lobs on a nine-by-five-foot table with a six-inch-high net. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

Knicks’ Jeremy Lin, superstar in the making?

Knicks’ Jeremy Lin, superstar in the making?

By Brian Mahoney
The Associated Press

Jeremy Lin (Photo from NBA.com)

NEW YORK (AP) — Jeremy Lin cut through the Nets’ defense all night before he was finally surrounded.

As teammates hugged him at center court while Pearl Jam’s “Jeremy” blasted through the arena, it was clear the New York Knicks had finally found a spark.

And even the Harvard-educated Lin struggled to explain how it ended up being him.

“This night, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet to be honest, he said. “It’s like I’m still kind of in shock about everything that happened, but I’m just trying to soak it all in right now.”

Lin scored a career-high 25 points, and the Knicks salvaged the finale of a back-to-back-to-back set by the New Jersey Nets 99–92 last Saturday night. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

EDITORIAL: Who should run: Hasegawa or Virk?

EDITORIAL: Who should run: Hasegawa or Virk?

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_07/editorial_hasegawavirk.jpg

Bob Hasegawa (left) and Bobby Virk

This is not the first time that Asian American candidates have competed for the same political seat. Dr. Bobby Virk, an orthodontist, has announced his candidacy for the 11th District state senate seat, a seat that Rep. Bob Hasegawa has also filed for. They are both Democrats. The seat is being vacated by Sen. Margarita Prentice, who is retiring.
The 11th District includes Seattle’s Beacon Hill, South Park, and portions of Renton, Kent, Tukwila, Burien, and the SeaTac area.
Virk is of Indian descent and has never been in office. Last year, he considered running for the 11th District seat, but he changed his plans when Prentice announced her retirement. So far, he has raised more than $200,000 and has received the endorsement of the senate caucus.
Currently, Hasegawa and Virk are each trying to persuade the other not to run. If they both run, it could destroy the community’s unity and hurt both their chances of getting the seat, especially if a third party joins the race.
Who should drop out?
Hasegawa has name familiarity after running for re-election three times. He has served in the legislature since 2005 and has gained the support of many Asians, especially Japanese and Chinese Americans. Virk, Prentice’s former fundraising chair, has Prentice’s and Indian Americans’ support, as well as money in the bank. He predicts that he could raise another $100,000 by the end of April.
I don’t think either Hasegawa or Virk is going to sacrifice their campaign for the other person. And they shouldn’t have to. This is a free country. Both are qualified candidates who have big dreams. This is a chance for them to prove that they can compete. Let the voters make their choice.
Let’s think positively. It’s good news that Asian Americans are so passionate about public service. Years ago, Asian Americans had a hard time finding anyone willing to run. We should celebrate the fact that the Asian community is so progressive. Community members understand that if they don’t come to the table themselves, they will have no voice.
When Asians run against Asians, there’s always a silver lining. It creates a bigger buzz. People are galvanized. Asian Americans become better campaigners, especially young people. Campaigning is the best way to nurture young people who aim for political careers.
The history of Asians running against their own began in 1984. Bob Santos ran against Cheryl Chow for King County Council. This did split the Asian vote. Ron Sims won as a result. In 1991, Martha Choe ran against Betty Patu for Seattle City Council. Choe won overwhelmingly. The Asian vote is critical in a tight race. In 1997, two Asians ran for Seattle mayor, Charlie Chong and Cheryl Chow, in a crowded race of five candidates. Chow lost in the primary and Chong lost in the general election. Many Asian Americans voted for Paul Schell to be mayor.
However, Patu learned about political campaigns after her loss. Patu later beat Wilson Chin for the Seattle School Board race in 2009. It divided the Asian community, as Chin was a strong candidate. But Patu had a following after working as an educator for decades.
In every campaign, we grow as a community. We have evolved into a sophisticated political machine in terms of fundraising, voter participation, and building relationships with the mainstream. Let’s thank our candidates who have the courage to run and serve, whether they win or lose! (end)

Posted in Editorials, Vol 31 No 7 | 2/11-2/17Comments (0)

DOWNLOADS

NWAW MEDIA KIT 2014



Weekly E-Newsletter

READ NWAW ONLINE!

Follow our tweets

Do you like us?

Photos on flickr