Tag Archive | "Vol 31 No 51 | December 15 – December 21"

Linebacker Manti Te’o wins LOTT Trophy, loses Heisman

Linebacker Manti Te’o wins LOTT Trophy, loses Heisman

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Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o won the LOTT Trophy Friday, Dec. 7. The LOTT Trophy is given to the top defensive player in college football, taking into consideration both the player’s on-field performance and his character and work off the field. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund announces 2013 Justice in Action Awards

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund announces 2013 Justice in Action Awards

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From left: John Lewis, Jose Vargas, and Simone Wu

The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) announced the 2013 Justice in Action Award recipients on Monday, Dec. 10. AALDEF will honor Congressman John Lewis, representative from Georgia; Jose Antonio Vargas, DREAM Act activist and journalist; and Simone Wu of Choice Hotels International. The awards will be presented at the organization’s Annual Lunar New Year Gala on Tuesday, Feb. 19 in New York City. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

ACLF hosts Community Leaders Program graduation dinner

ACLF hosts Community Leaders Program graduation dinner

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The 2012 graduates of the ACLF Community Leaders Program

The Asian Pacific Islander Community Leader held their 13th annual Community Leaders Program graduation dinner on Nov. 17, 2012 at South Seattle Community College. In addition to celebrating the graduates, the dinner also raised money for the program next year and honored Mai Nguyen, winner of the Kip Tokuda award. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Puget Sound Business Journal names largest minority-owned businesses

The Puget Sound Business Journal and the University of Washington Minority Business Awards released the list of largest minority-owned businesses on Friday, Dec. 7. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Illegal immigration drops after decade of growth

By Hope Yen
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — New census data released Thursday, Dec. 6 affirms a clear and sustained drop in illegal immigration, ending more than a decade of increases. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Takei beams into Archie’s Riverdale

Takei beams into Archie’s Riverdale

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George Takei

By Matt Moore
The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA, Penn. (AP) — Mr. Sulu in Riverdale? Oh my! Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Myanmar apologizes for violence against monks

By Aye Aye Win
The Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar’s government apologized for a violent crackdown on Buddhist monks and other foes of a copper mine in northwest Myanmar, which was the biggest use of force against demonstrators since reformist President Thein Sein took office last year. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21, World NewsComments (0)

Psy apologizes for anti-American rap

Psy apologizes for anti-American rap

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Park Jae-sang

By Chris Talbott
AP Music Writer

South Korean rapper and Internet sensation PSY is apologizing to Americans for participating in anti-U.S. protests several years ago. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Right hand ends Pacquiao’s night

Right hand ends Pacquiao’s night

By Tim Dahlberg
AP Boxing Writer

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Before Saturday night, Pacquiao and Marquez had already met in the ring three times. Now, a fifth may be upcoming. (Photo from Manny Pacquiao)

LAS VEGAS, Nevada (AP) — The idea of Manny Pacquiao being knocked out cold was shocking enough. The sight of him face down on the canvas, unresponsive even as bedlam broke out all around him, was positively frightening. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Living life after loss

Living life after loss

By Samantha Pak
Northwest Asian Weekly

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_51/book1.jpgIsle of Dreams
By Keizo Hino
Dakley Archive Press, 2010

Shozo Sakai hasn’t seen much change in his life.

He’s worked at the same construction firm for years, he has no ambitions of moving up the corporate ladder or pursuing a specific career, and  he has lived in the same place for decades. Except for the occasional bouts of loneliness, even his wife’s death has done little to interrupt his day-to-day life.

In his spare time, Shozo likes to wander around Tokyo and admire the city’s great architecture. Eventually, the middle-aged widower discovers the Isle of Dreams. Contrary to its name, the isle is actually a piece of reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay that the city uses to dump garbage. But for Shozo, the landfill is a place of wonder. He sees every piece of garbage as being filled with life and beauty. And through his visits to this garbage paradise, he meets Yoko Hayashi, a young woman who uses the site as a motorcycle obstacle course.

As Shozo and Yoko spend more time together, Shozo begins to feel changes within himself — becoming more of who he thinks he really is, rather than the person he has been. Shozo also begins to see his city change, as Yoko shows him another side of Tokyo he’s never seen before — a Tokyo far from the high rises and dense population.

The phrase, “one man’s garbage is another man’s treasure” rings especially true in “Isle of Dreams,” as Hino describes Shozo’s observations at the landfill in great detail. Discarded mannequins, children’s shoes, and even old spaghetti can be seen as beautiful and full of life, if we just look.

Hino also shows that it is never too late to figure out who you are. His wife’s death may not have led him directly to the Isle of Dreams, but it was through the free time Shozo gained as a bachelor that brought him to that chance encounter with Yoko and on his journey of self discovery.

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_51/book2.jpgIn the Lap of the Gods
By Li Miao Lovett
Leapfrog Press, 2010

Liu Renfu has lost all that is dear to him. His wife, unborn child, and home now lie beneath the waters of the Three Gorges Dam, and the former coal worker has been reduced to scavenging as a way to make a living.

It is through this scavenging that he comes across a baby girl, abandoned on the side of the road as a dam rises on the Yangtze River. Liu takes the baby in and begins the journey of a man struggling to make a living in modern China.

Along the way, we meet more individuals trying to move on — or not move on — after suffering their own losses: Mr. Wu, an old man trying to reconnect with a past love from a previous lifetime; Mei Ling, the young woman working to get by in the city, while sending money home to her estranged family; Rose, the confused infant with vague memories of a mother she never really knew; and the villagers who refuse to leave their family homes despite the danger of the rising dam.

Despite all that they face, the characters continue with their daily lives, reminding readers that life goes on, even if we don’t. And, while things may seem bleak, “In the Lap of the Gods” also shows us that once we work to move on, we can come to appreciate the things we have all the more.

This is what happens to Liu as he bonds with his adopted daughter Rose. Having never had the opportunity to know his biological child, Liu’s growing relationship with the foundling — after initially contemplating selling her — is the foundation of the story, showing readers some good can come from even the worst situations.

It is also a story about the culture clash between old China and new China. The story will have readers contemplating the cost of progress and wondering whether all the technological advances we have made are really worth it, if it means the loss of jobs, homes, and in some cases, humanity.

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_51/book3.jpgA Hundred Flowers
By Gail Tsukiyama
St. Martin’s Press, 2012

In 1957, Chairman Mao has declared a new openness in China, “Let a hundred flowers bloom. Let a hundred schools of thought contend.”

Many intellectuals are skeptical, suspecting a trick. Kai Ying’s husband Sheng, a schoolteacher, has promised to not do anything to endanger their son Tao, but just before Tao’s sixth birthday, Sheng is arrested for writing a letter criticizing the Communist Party. Sheng is sent to a labor camp for “re-education,” while his family must continue with their lives.

One year later, Tao breaks his leg while climbing the old kapok tree in front of their home.

In the aftermath of her son’s injury, her husband’s absence and the sudden addition of Sunyi, a teenage girl who unexpectedly shows up and gives birth to a baby girl at their home, Kai Ying tries to hold her family together.

“A Hundred Flowers” is the story of a family working to get through a difficult time and while the loss they feel is not through a death, the uncertainty about whether Sheng is alive, is worse. During a time when things could fall apart, the family eventually pulls together, even as guilty secrets are revealed and arguments arise.

On the surface, Kai Ying’s family seems fairly average. They’re just one of many families struggling amidst China’s Cultural Revolution. But what Tsukiyama does throughout the story is show that even ordinary, everyday people can do extraordinary things when the time calls for it. This serves as a reminder to readers that we are capable of more than we think — an inspiring message for anyone going through a hard time. (end)

Samantha Pak can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (1)

Seattle-born professor releases new translation of the I Ching

Seattle-born professor releases new translation of the I Ching

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_51/ae_ching.jpgLast fall, a new translation of the classic Chinese text, the “I Ching,” or “Book of Changes,” appeared in bookstores. This new version of the centuries-old text for divining one’s future appeared courtesy of a professor who grew up in Seattle and learned about Asian cultures from her early teachers. Her name is Dr. Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Features, Profiles, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (1)

APA contributors honored at dinner

APA contributors honored at dinner

By Ninette Cheng
Northwest Asian Weekly

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From left: Sesinando Cantor, Jun Bae Kim, Bob Ferguson, Sam Ung, Bob Santos, Trong Pham, Jay Inslee, Sandy Huynh, Someireh Amirfaiz, Joan Yoshitomi, Mark Okazaki, and Dennis Su posing with a print of Japanese paper cut by Bellevue-based artist Aki Sogabe given to Inslee by the NWAW. (Photo by Binh Tran)

Leadership, volunteerism, and movers and shakers were the name of the game at the Northwest Asian Weekly and NWAW Foundation’s Top Contributors to the Asian Community banquet on Dec. 7. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Profiles, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Poet Nellie Wong serves up sustenance and struggle

Poet Nellie Wong serves up sustenance and struggle

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Nellie Wong (Photo courtesy of the Freedom Socialist Party)

By Signe Predmore
Northwest Asian Weekly

If there’s one thing that Oakland-based poet Nellie Wong wants to make clear, it’s that she’s no Amy Tan. Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Features, Profiles, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

Vietnamese American boy who committed suicide in Utah was bullied

By Lena Sullivan
The Associated Press

A 14-year-old junior high school student in Utah committed suicide by shooting himself in the head in front of a group of classmates on Thursday, Nov. 29. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

First same-sex marriages held

First same-sex marriages held

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Photo from King County

After the passage of Referendum 74, same-sex marriages became legal in Washington state on Thursday, Dec. 6. King County awarded the first same-sex marriage license at 12:01 a.m. to Jane Abbott Lighty (77) and Pete-e Peterson (85) of West Seattle. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Features, Vol 31 No 50 | 12/8-12/14Comments (0)

BLOG: 10 holiday gift-giving tips to help you shop better

BLOG: 10 holiday gift-giving tips to help you shop better

By Assunta Ng

Holiday gift givers often have misconceptions. They think that gifts have to be material or that they have to be valuable. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 31 No 50 | 12/8-12/14Comments (0)

PICTORIAL: The 2012 Top  Contributors Banquet

PICTORIAL: The 2012 Top Contributors Banquet

Photos by Binh Tran and Rebecca Ip

The dining room

From left: Sesinando Cantor, Jun Bae Kim, Bob Ferguson, Sam Ung, Bob Santos, Trong Pham, Jay Inslee, Sandy Huynh, Someireh Amirfaiz, Joan Yoshitomi, Mark Okazaki, and Dennis Su posing with a print of Japanese paper cut by Bellevue-based artist Aki Sogabe given to Inslee by the NWAW.

Robert Mak giving remarks.

Jay Inslee with cousin Mark

Bob Ferguson with gift from NWAW

Joan Yoshitomi with Judge Marcine Anderson

Event sponsors with Jay Inslee and Bob Ferguson

Someireh Amirfaiz with Martha Choe

Sam Ung with Judge Kimi Kondo

Bob Hasegawa with Nina Odell

Jun Bae Kim with the leaders of his organizations

Jun Bae Kim with Teri Wong

Sandy Huynh with Judge Dean Lum

Sesinando Cantor with Rep. Marcie Maxwell

Mark Okazaki with Judge Pat Oishi

Dennis Su with Mark Mitsui

Trong Pham with the leaders of his organizations

Trong Pham with Nina Odell

Posted in Community News, Features, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)

EDITORIAL: It’s time to start moving on education — U.S. ranks behind Asia in math and science

Two reports released by the Department of Education on Tuesday, Dec. 11 showed that American fourth- and eighth-grade students still lag globally in math and science. The United States ranked 11th and 7th in fourth-grade math and science, respectively, and 9th and 10th in eighth-grade math and science. Read the full story

Posted in Editorials, Vol 31 No 51 | 12/15-12/21Comments (0)


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