Tag Archive | "Vol 31 No 45 | November 3 – November 9"

Gary T. Choo joins Edmonds Chamber of Commerce

Gary T. Choo joined the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors on Monday, Oct. 29. He brings his experience from founding GTC Financial Services and his perspective as a Korean American small business owner. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

Go Get It Gal founder Taryn Kama honored by UW Women’s Center

Go Get It Gal founder Taryn Kama honored by UW Women’s Center

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Taryn Kama

Go Get It Gal founder Taryn Kama will be one of the women honored at the University of Washington Women’s Center’s annual “Women of Courage: Braving New Horizons” gala to be held on Nov. 3.

The event will honor women in Washington who have made lasting contributions to their communities.

Go Get It Gal is an Olympia-based business that provides women with resources, a community, and opportunities to develop themselves and transform their lives. The company currently offers European cycling tours, learn-to-surf clinics, and training rides.

Kama launched the company in January 2012 and hosted the first cycling tour of the Alps in August.

“I am deeply honored to be recognized in this way and I am proud to represent Go Get It Gal and all women who push themselves to the limits in the outdoors,” Kama said. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

Vietnamese Poet Du Tu Le exhibited at Renton restaurant

Vietnamese Poet Du Tu Le exhibited at Renton restaurant

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From left to right: Comcast’s Risa Janzen, Du Tu Le, and Ruta Publisher Mohamud Yssuf.

Oil paintings of Vietnamese poet Lê Cự Phách, better known by his pen name Du Tử Lê, were exhibited at Spring Taste restaurant in Renton on Saturday, Oct. 20. The event was sponsored by Seabeez and Comcast. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (1)

CACA team to present at National Social Studies Conference

CACA team to present at National Social Studies Conference

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From left to right: Maxine Loo, Joanne Dufour, Ming-Ming Tung-Edelman, and Bettie Luke.

The Chinese American Citizens Alliance (CACA) will be making a presentation entitled “60 years of Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

Vietnamese Americans try to save stories

By Amy Taxin
The Associated Press

IRVINE, Calif. (AP) — The knock came at night more than 30 years ago. Hugo Van, then a young man, had a chance to flee newly communist Vietnam and walk to freedom. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (1)

No high court action on voting rights law

By Mark Sherman and Jay Reeves
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — Three years ago, the Supreme Court warned there could be constitutional problems with a landmark civil rights law that has opened voting booths to millions of African Americans. Now, opponents of a key part of the Voting Rights Act are asking the high court to finish off that provision. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

In Vietnam, US relies on pirate site to network

By Chris Brummitt
The Associated Press

SAIGON, Vietnam (AP) — It’s a wildly popular website laden with unlicensed songs and Hollywood movies, a prime exhibit of the digital piracy that affects the music industry in Asia and eroding legitimate online sales around the world. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9, World NewsComments (1)

4 Philippine marines killed in clash

By Jim Gomez
The Associated Press

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Philippine marines who were searching for long-held hostages battled al-Qaida-linked militants in a fierce clash that killed four marines and at least two insurgents in the country’s south, officials said.

The fighting erupted in the mountainous hinterlands of Patikul town in Sulu province, where the Abu Sayyaf movement has survived in jungle encampments despite years of U.S.-backed Philippine military offensives. Twenty-two marines were wounded in the daylong clash Sunday that involved up to 200 Abu Sayyaf fighters and their allies, officials said.

Regional military commander Maj. Gen. Rey Ardo ordered air force planes and navy ships to back up government forces, ensure the recovery of the slain marines and transport the wounded to a hospital.

However, bad weather delayed the rapid deployment of assault helicopters and by the time they flew over, the militants had dispersed, the marines said.

Regional military spokesman Lt. Col. Randolph Cabangbang said the marines had been deployed in Patikul to check the reported sighting of hostages held by the Abu Sayyaf, which has been blamed for separate kidnappings of two Europeans, a Japanese, a Jordanian and two Filipinos. They stumbled upon the militants under Abu Sayyaf commander Radulan Sahiron and gunmen loyal to Tahir Sali, a commander of the larger rebel group Moro National Liberation Front.

Sahiron and Sali, who maintain encampments in Patikul’s jungles, have long been suspected of collaborating to carry out ransom kidnappings to raise funds.

The Europeans _ Ewold Horn of the Netherlands and Lorenzo Vinciguerra of Switzerland _ were seized by gunmen in February while bird watching in the southernmost island province of Tawi Tawi. They were later moved to nearby Jolo Island in Sulu province, where they have been seen by villagers in the custody of Abu Sayyaf gunmen, according to police.

Police initially believed the two were seized by ordinary kidnapping gangs.

Aside from the Europeans, the militants are believed to be holding a Japanese treasure hunter, along with a Jordanian TV journalist and two Filipino crewmen who reportedly traveled to Abu Sayyaf camps in Sulu to interview the militants in June but have failed to return.

While Abu Sayyaf abductions still occur, they are far fewer today than the massive kidnappings that terrorized Sulu and outlying provinces in early 2000 when the brutal group still had many commanders and strong ties with terrorist organizations including the Indonesian-based Jemaah Islamiyah.

The militant Islamist movement has also received support in the past from al-Qaida. (end)

Posted in Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9, World NewsComments (0)

WongFu short leaves something to be desired

WongFu short leaves something to be desired

By Charles Lam
Northwest Asian Weekly

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From left to right: Wesley Chan, Ted Fu, and Philip Wang (Photo by Casey Penk)

Let me start off by saying that I’ve been a WongFu fan since YouTube and Google Video were direct Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Features, ProfilesComments (0)

BLOG:10 healthy eating tips with East–West cooking

BLOG:10 healthy eating tips with East–West cooking

By Assunta Ng
Northwest Asian Weekly

How you eat effects how you feel. Eat well, and your body will feel good. Eat badly, and it won’t. One of my friends suggested eating organic, but the trouble is, sometimes, organic food doesn’t taste good. It also restricts your diet. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (3)

Strength in Youth — NWAW’s monthly must-reads

Strength in Youth — NWAW’s monthly must-reads

By Samantha Pak
Northwest Asian Weekly

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_45/shelf_saraswati.jpgSaraswati’s Way
By Monika Schroder
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010

Akash, a 12-year-old boy living in a small village in the Indian desert, is not like the other kids.

First of all, he loves school and would rather spend his days in a classroom absorbing knowledge than playing cricket or other games with his peers. Second, he has a real knack for math and has reached a level beyond that of his teacher. Finally, Akash is so determined to find a good math tutor that he leaves his village and family for Delhi in hopes of a better education. This tutor will hopefully help him prepare for an upcoming exam which could lead to a scholarship for a good school.

“Saraswati’s Way” is the story of a young boy who just cannot catch a break but doesn’t let it get in the way of his dreams. Whether it’s dealing with his father’s death or figuring out how to survive in the city, Akash remains strong, never losing sight of his goal or his faith. He will often pray to Saraswati, the Hindu goddess of wisdom and knowledge, and Ganesha, the Hindu god of good luck and remover of obstacles, for their help.

Although he is still young, Akash is someone individuals of all ages could look up to. As desperate times call for desperate measures, Akash resorts to less-than-honest means of earning money to pay for a tutor, but he feels guilty the entire time, knowing that what he’s doing is wrong.

“Saraswati’s Way” also stresses the importance of family. While Akash leaves home for seemingly selfish reasons, his family is never absent from his thoughts. He makes a promise to himself to send gifts home when he finally earns enough money. Akash is also not alone as he meets a number of boys in Delhi who are in similar positions. Although the situations in “Saraswati’s Way” are extreme, this is an important lesson for young people to learn and know that they are never too young to contribute to and help their families.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_45/shelf_redscarf.jpgRed Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution
By Ji-li Jiang
HarperCollins Publishers, 1997

The year is 1966 and the Cultural Revolution in China has just begun.

In the middle of it all is Ji-li Jiang, a smart and talented 12-year-old living in Shanghai with a bright future ahead of her. But all of that disappears as the Revolution picks up in full force and it becomes clear that her family’s reasonably good fortune and background is a black mark against them. Soon, Ji-li finds herself humiliated on a regular basis by classmates she used to help tutor. Her neighbors are searched based on the slightest hint of counter-revolutionary acts. Ji-li and her family live in constant fear that they may be next.

“Red Scarf Girl” is the true story of Ji-li Jiang’s life during the first few years of the Cultural Revolution.

Initially, she believes things are happening for the good of the country, but she quickly begins to question people’s actions and motives.

Readers are treated to a firsthand account of this terrifying era during which neighbors and friends – even families – turned on each other in the name of survival. No one knew who to trust.

For anyone who grew up in the West, the idea of being punished for saying anything against your government and children breaking ties with their families in order to improve their class status may be difficult to grasp. But Jiang paints a very clear picture of her experiences and readers will fear for her and her family as they endure some very intense moments.

The situations Ji-li finds herself in – including watching people search and ransack her family’s home in the name of the Revolution and visiting her father in prison – are terrifying. But she stays strong as she comes to learn what she really values.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/31_45/shelf_children.jpgChildren of the River
By Linda Crew
Laurel-Leaf Books, 1989

In 1975, 13-year-old Sundara Sovann is sent to live with her aunt’s family in the Cambodian region of Ream after her father deems Phnom Penh too dangerous for her as the Khmer Rouge takes over the capital city.

She and her aunt’s family are quickly forced to flee as well and they end up in Oregon. Four years later, at 17, Sundara is having a difficult time fitting in at her American high school while remaining “a good Cambodian girl” at home. This becomes more difficult as she meets Jonathan, an American boy from school who is as attracted to her as she is to him.

To top this all off, Sundara still grieves for her parents, siblings, and her childhood love — as well as her aunt’s newborn baby who died on the boat trip to the United States — all of whom she had left behind and has never heard from since.

“Children of the River” tells the story of a young woman who overcomes major obstacles to get to where she is and continues to struggle as she longs for a new beginning and happiness, but can’t let go of her past in fear of letting go of those she loves.

Sundara is a strong and admirable character, but she also has a sensitivity and vulnerability about her that she tries to hide. However, she’s not invincible and, in a flashback, we see just how strong she really is.

As a teenager in a new country, Sundara has also reached a couple of crossroads in her life — as an immigrant trying to settle in her new home and as a girl on her way to becoming a woman. The way she navigates her way through this period of her life, in addition to dealing with her grief, is nothing short of inspiring. Readers will cheer for her throughout her entire journey. (end)

Samantha Pak can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (1)

Kin On offering end-of-life comfort care with Kline Galland Hospice Services

Kin On has established a new partnership with Kline Galland Hospice Services to provide end-of-life comfort Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

Seattle-area ethnic chambers of commerce and community groups to host Seattle Police Appreciation night honoring officers

Seattle-area ethnic chambers of commerce and community groups in cooperation with Mayor McGinn will be hosting a police appreciation night the evening of Tuesday, Nov. 13 at the NewHolly Neighborhood Campus. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

EDITORIAL: Iron Man shaves Fu Manchu

When Marvel began developing movies for their characters, I was cautiously optimistic. Their characters have become American icons and seeing them on the big screen with ridiculous special effects budgets was going to be amazing. But because the characters are so old, many of them dating back to the 1960s, I knew that eventually the issue of race was going to come up. Read the full story

Posted in Editorials, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (1)

JACL Co-President Elaine Reiko Akagi  passes away during cancer treatment

JACL Co-President Elaine Reiko Akagi passes away during cancer treatment

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Elaine Reiko Akagi

The Seattle Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) sadly announces the passing of its co-president, Elaine Reiko Akagi.  Ms. Akagi passed away on Oct. 18, 2012 in Silver Spring, Md., where she was being treated for cancer. Read the full story

Posted in Obituaries, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (1)

School-provided breakfast wins Dearborn Park Elementary an award

School-provided breakfast wins Dearborn Park Elementary an award

By Charles Lam
Northwest Asian Weekly

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From left to right: Seattle Superintendent Jose Banda, Seattle School Board Director Betty Patu, Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, and Debra Entenman from the Office of Rep. Adam Smith. (Photo by Charles Lam/NWAW)

Dearborn Park Elementary was awarded a Super School award last Friday, Oct. 26, for its performance in Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Education, Features, Profiles, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

Wen Jiabao’s family denies $2.7 billion in ‘hidden riches’

Wen Jiabao’s family denies $2.7 billion in ‘hidden riches’

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Premier Wen Jiabao at the World Economic Forum. (Photo from the World Economic Forum)

By Staff
The Associated Press

BEIJING, China (AP) — Lawyers have denied a report that Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao’s family Read the full story

Posted in Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9, World NewsComments (0)

Asian American vote can swing tight races

Asian American vote can swing tight races

By Mico Letargo
NEW AMERICA MEDIA

LOS ANGELES – In a paper entitled “Asian Americans at the Ballot Box: The 2008 General Elections in Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 31 No 45 | 11/3-11/9Comments (0)

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