Tag Archive | "Vol 30 No 51 | December 17 – December 23"

Refugees share personal stories at Beyond Talking Points

Refugees share personal stories at Beyond Talking Points

Beyond Talking Points panelists, from left: Som Acharya (Bhutan), Nan Htet (Burma), Marwa Zahid (Iraq), Thuy Tran (Vietnam), and Hien Kieu (former nationality, Vietnamese; ethnicity, Cham)

On Nov. 16 at the Bellevue Art Museum, Humanities Washington’s Beyond Talking Points series wrapped up its multifaceted look at immigration with a program featuring refugees from around the world who now call Washington home. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

NAAAP-Seattle honors 4 scholarship recipients at gala

NAAAP-Seattle honors 4 scholarship recipients at gala

From left: Reyna Farina Rollolazo, Cong Nguyen, Alyna Merali, and Chris Fong

The National Association of Asian American Professionals’ Seattle chapter (NAAAP-Seattle) hosted its 32nd annual gala and scholarship reception on Nov. 4. The event was held at the Woodland Park Zoo’s Zoomazium and honored four students. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

China honors Putin with Confucius Prize

China honors Putin with Confucius Prize

By Alexa Olesen
The Associated Press

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin

BEIJING (AP) — The sponsors of a would-be Chinese alternative to the Nobel Peace Prize held their second award ceremony on Friday, handing a gold Confucius statue and a certificate meant for Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin to a pair of exchange students, an organizer said.

The Confucius Prize ceremony comes a day before the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize is to be awarded in Oslo, Norway, and as a group of Nobel laureates launched a new campaign calling for China to release last year’s Nobel laureate, dissident writer Liu Xiaobo, from prison.

A group called the China International Peace Research Center hastily launched the Confucius Peace Prize last year in an attempt to counter the news of the Peace Prize going to Liu, who is serving an 11-year prison sentence for co-authoring an appeal for political reform.

Liu’s win enraged the government and Chinese nationalists, who accused the Nobel committee of interfering in China’s legal system as part of a plot to bring the nation down in disgrace. Read the full story

Posted in NewsComments (0)

Bill Gates developing nuclear reactor with China

Bill Gates developing nuclear reactor with China

Bill Gates

BEIJING (AP) — Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates says he is in discussions with China to jointly develop a new kind of nuclear reactor.

During a talk at China’s Ministry of Science & Technology on Wednesday, the billionaire said, “The idea is to be very low cost, very safe, and generate very little waste.”

Gates backs Washington-based TerraPower, which is developing a nuclear reactor that can run on depleted uranium.

He says TerraPower is having “very good discussions” with state-owned China National Nuclear Corporation.

Gates says perhaps as much as a billion dollars will be put into research and development over the next five years. (end)

Posted in Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23, World NewsComments (0)

New proposed bill would ban abortions based on sex or race

By David Crary
The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — The practice of sex-selection abortion, usually targeting a female fetus due to parental preference for a son, has few defenders in the United States. Yet a proposed federal ban is drawing vehement opposition from liberal advocacy groups who call it a veiled attempt to undermine broader abortion rights. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

9 things to do in Seattle with your guests during the holidays

9 things to do in Seattle with your guests during the holidays

By Assunta Ng
Northwest Asian Weekly

How do you entertain your out-of-town friends and family during the holidays? The best way is to present them programs and entertainment with a Northwest flair. Read the full story

Posted in Cultures, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

A-POP! Jin breaking into the mainstream?

A-POP! Jin breaking into the mainstream?

By Vivian Nguyen
Northwest Asian Weekly

Sometimes, when one person’s dream begins, the dream unfortunately ends for someone else. Such is the case for two Asian celebrities featured in this month’s column. Read the full story

Posted in Column: Pop Culture, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (4)

BLOG: What Locke doesn’t do — 5th and final part of the Gary Locke blog series

BLOG: What Locke doesn’t do — 5th and final part of the Gary Locke blog series

By Assunta Ng

After reading my blog, some Washingtonians sent me a recent photo of them and Ambassador Locke. It was purely a coincidence that Locke ran into the group. Small world, right? From left: Nicole Robinson from Yakima, Yen Duong from Seattle, Brian Wong from Shoreline, and Locke (Photo by Yen Duong)

So you want to help your relatives and friends from China come to the United States. You think Ambassador Gary Locke can help you?  Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

BLOG: The vital role of consulates and embassies

By Assunta Ng

Ordinary folks think only of visas when they think of consul generals. Actually, consul generals play an important role in serving the local community. For instance, the recent haze in Beijing, which shut down airports and highway transportation, caused local people to turn to the U.S. Embassy for an accurate measure of pollution in the city. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (3)

‘Outrage’ aptly portrays yakuza, but too gory

‘Outrage’ aptly portrays yakuza, but too gory


By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

Takeshi Kitano’s new film “Outrage” opens with the camera panning slowly across a group of men slouching against luxury cars, some fanning themselves in the heat. They are the yakuza promised in the film’s advance publicity, but they are not stylish. They do not immediately look dangerous.

The filmmaker loses sight of many things in this disappointing film, but this new look at the Japanese gangsters’ world, a realistic and anti-romantic view going against the grain of earlier yakuza movies, is the one thing he gets right.

The men outside are waiting for their bosses inside the building to finish business. They take their orders from the supreme boss, “Mr. Chairman” (played by Sôichirô Kitamura), and the meeting isn’t over until he says, “We’re done here.”

Takeshi Kitano’s own character, Otomo, isn’t invited in. He gets to wait outside with the other flunkies, although he runs a crew of savagely violent men, who help the bosses get things done. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

Mayor Ed Lee reflects on a childhood in Seattle and a career in San Francisco

Mayor Ed Lee reflects on a childhood in Seattle and a career in San Francisco

By Jeffrey Osborn
Northwest Asian Weekly

Mayor Ed Lee (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

The date is May 5, 1952, and in a Seattle hospital, a piece of American history was born.

Edwin Mah Lee was born to immigrant parents from the Chinese province of Guandong. They had moved to America hoping for a better life. Edwin Lee would eventually realize his parents’ dream and later become the first Chinese American mayor of San Francisco.

Lee, who prefers to be called Ed, grew up with his mother, father, and five siblings in Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood.

“I was the fifth of six children in our family. We had a pretty large family.” The size of the family required both parents to work diligently to provide for it. Lee’s father worked as a cook in restaurants, and his mother worked odd jobs around Seattle.

When asked about his involvement around the house, Lee said, “I always felt responsible to help my family. Even though I was the middle child, I thought it was important that with such a large family, I pitch in.” Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Profiles, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

Chess leads to more thoughtful children?

Chess leads to more thoughtful children?

By Nan Nan Liu
Northwest Asian Weekly

 “Daddy, I won! I won!” exclaimed Jaden Gao. Read the full story

Posted in Features, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

Korean poet gives back by teaching at Renton Tech

Korean poet gives back by teaching at Renton Tech

Read the full story

Posted in Profiles, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (1)

Breaking through the bamboo ceiling

Breaking through the bamboo ceiling

By Nina Huang
Northwest Asian Weekly

From left: Mark Mitsui, Patrick Yalung, Sherri Wade, Dianne Chong, Sue Anderson, Paul Killpatrick, Steven Gonzalez, Paul Ishii, and Sung Yang (Photo from George Liu/NWAW)

Every year, the Northwest Asian Weekly recognizes some of the most influential community leaders in the area at the Diversity at the Top awards dinner and gala. This year, the paper honors 10 individuals who have fought to break through the bamboo ceiling to get to the top. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

EDITORIAL: Don’t go overboard on holiday spending, teach kids to think of those less fortunate

Here is a story that we read online recently, and maybe it’s familiar to you, too.

A six-year-old child opens gifts upon mountains of brightly colored gifts. The holiday gifts are from various relatives, but mostly, they are from the child’s grandparents, who must have spent hundreds of dollars on the presents. Read the full story

Posted in Editorials, Vol 30 No 51 | 12/17-12/23Comments (0)

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