Tag Archive | "Vol 30 No 39 | September 24 – September 30"

ReWA celebrates with 2011 Annual Gala

ReWA celebrates with 2011 Annual Gala

The Refugee Women’s Alliance (ReWA) held its annual gala on Sept. 16, featuring dance performances and music from around the world. The event was held at Marion McCaw Hall at Seattle Center.

ReWA is a multi-ethnic, community-based organization that provides comprehensive culturally and linguistically appropriate services to refugee and immigrant communities throughout King and Snohomish Counties. (end)

All photos by George Liu/NWAW

The Seattle Chinese Orchestra at ReWA’s annual gala

The Peacock Dance, performed by Hengda Dance Academy

The audience of ReWA’s 2011 Annual Gala, held at McCaw Hall on Sept. 16

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn (center) with his wife, Peggy Lynch, and City of Seattle staffmember Thao Tran (right of Lynch)

ReWA Executive Director Someireh Amirfaiz (left) and ReWA Board Chair Mahnaz Eshetu

 

Posted in Community News, Cultures, Features, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Sept. 12: Local community holds meet-and-greet with Paul Killpatrick

Sept. 12: Local community holds meet-and-greet with Paul Killpatrick

From left: Seattle Community Colleges Chancellor Jill Wakefield, Paul Killpatrick, organizer Al Sugiyama, and Vivian Lee at Four Seas Restaurant (Photo by Assunta Ng/NWAW)

Local community members sponsored a meet-and-greet with Seattle Central Community College (SCCC) President Paul Killpatrick at the Four Seas Restaurant in the International District. The event was organized by Al Sugiyama. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Sept. 15: OCA-Greater Seattle holds its annual Golden Circle Awards dinner

Sept. 15: OCA-Greater Seattle holds its annual Golden Circle Awards dinner

Award winners, from left: Jeff Hou, Dale Hom, Sharon Lee, and MarPac co-founder Don Mar (Photo by Assunta Ng/NWAW)

The Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA)-Greater Seattle held its annual Golden Circles Awards Dinner, which honored those who have made significant contributions to the social, political, and economic well-being of Asian Pacific Americans. This year’s theme was Building Legacy, centering on community development. Read the full story

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Sept: 19: Nikkei Concerns holds ground-breaking ceremony for new garden

Sept: 19: Nikkei Concerns holds ground-breaking ceremony for new garden

Local elected officials, Consul General of Japan Ota, community leaders and supporters, and Nikkei staff members at the ground-breaking ceremony (Photo by Eugene Tagawa)

King County Councilmember Bruce Harrell speaks at the groundbreaking

Nikkei Concerns held a ground-breaking ceremony for a new garden at its five-star accredited rehabilitation and care center, Seattle Keiro. The ceremony featured a traditional Japanese ground-breaking ritual and included Consul General of Japan Kiyokazu Ota, local elected officials, and community leaders/supporters as invited speakers and guests, including Seattle’s Deputy Mayor Darryl Smith.

Founded in 1975, Nikkei Concerns is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the health and wellness of Japanese American and Asian Pacific Islander elders throughout the greater Puget Sound region. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Sept. 1: Tet in Seattle and others win 2011 Mayor’s Arts Awards

Sept. 1: Tet in Seattle and others win 2011 Mayor’s Arts Awards

Tet in Seattle Director Khanh Vu (right), holding his award, with Mayor McGinn (Photo provided by Tet in Seattle)

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn gave out six 2011 Mayor’s Arts Awards at a ceremony at Seattle Center.

The winners were  Tet in Seattle, Choreographer and Artistic Director of Spectrum Dance Theatre Donald Byrd, Jack Straw Productions, Violinist and Professor Quinton Morris, On the Boards, and Pratt Fine Arts Center.

Tet in Seattle is the producer of  Tet Festival, a free community celebration held annually as part of Festál, a series of world festivals at Seattle Center. (end)

Posted in Names in the News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Wayne’s Worlds: Sunny, the Renaissance man — a story

Wayne’s Worlds: Sunny, the Renaissance man — a story

Humor columnist Wayne Chan

By Wayne Chan
Northwest Asian Weekly

Once upon a time, in a quaint and quiet hamlet, stood a modest row of shops, unremarkable from any other unassuming row of shops in any other quiet hamlet, yet still serving the needs of the town’s inhabitants, as well as those passing through in their journey through town.

On one recent cool and rainy day, a family of five on their way to a recreational retreat, decided to find respite from the elements and stumbled upon this unassuming row of shops in this quiet little hamlet.

As they approached the row of stores, they came upon one shop in particular that caught their eye — a small eatery called “Sunny’s Noodle Shop,” adorned with colorful signs of various shapes and sizes that enticed not because of the quality of the signs, but indeed, in spite of them. Mismatched signs, such as a white, half-covered sign that read “Lunch Special” that sat above a smaller, translucent sign that read “Special Lunch,” were taped next to signs with the word “Spicy,” a word used to entice, not to warn.

As the family walked in, they were greeted by a short stout man with a relaxed smile on his face, wearing a navy blue shirt and loose fitting dark slacks.

“Hello, my name is Sunny. Please have a seat,” he said.

http://www.nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/30_39/wayne_sunny.jpg

Image by Stacy Nguyen/NWAW

 

The family, realizing that they were being served by the actual owner of the shop, sat down and began to peruse the menu, with a seemingly endless list of delectable dumplings, tantalizing soups, aromatic rice dishes, and of course, spicy noodle entrees.

With no one else in the shop, Sunny slowly approached the family and took their order on a pad of paper, taking his time to make helpful suggestions on various dishes to consider. “Please try our spicy beef noodle bowl,” he would say, or “Our shrimp dumplings are also very, very special.”

After suggesting a seemingly endless array of dishes, Sunny excused himself and disappeared into the kitchen.

Within a few minutes, he came out of the kitchen holding a tray with five soup bowls and as he began to serve each bowl of soup, a man and woman walked in with their two children. Sunny immediately grabbed another set of menus and sat the family down at a table near the family of five, and he took their order.

Sunny walked briskly back into the kitchen. Peering through the doorway into the kitchen, one could see Sunny moving quickly about, stirring one pot, while holding a wok up to toss another dish.

Sunny, apparently, was also the head chef. Actually, Sunny was the only chef.

A few more minutes passed, and Sunny came out with a tray full of dishes, three dishes for the family of five, and a plate of dumplings for the second family.

Also, there waiting for him were two more families.

Sunny was now in a perpetual jog, as he bounced from table to table, seating more families (Sunny the host), taking orders and serving dishes (Sunny the waiter), clearing dishes and refilling water glasses (Sunny the busboy), or cooking the meals (Sunny the solitary chef).

At one point, the father from the family of five peered over at the steaming plate of dumplings, and as Sunny passed him by with another set of menus for another set of guests, the father said, “You know what, I think we’d like to order some of those dumplings, too.”

Sunny stopped in mid-step, his eyes widening with a slightly panicked look on his face. A tiny drop of perspiration rolled down his forehead. His only response was, “Uh … OK.”

For the next 20 minutes, the kitchen was ablaze with activity. While not much could be seen outside the flurry of activity when Sunny was at the stove, the kitchen would systematically shift from one set of sounds to another, each sound immediately identifiable. Whether it was the clink and clack of pots and pans (from Sunny the chef) or the sound of chopping on a chopping board (Sunny the sous chef), or the squeak and shush of washing dishes (Sunny the dishwasher), everyone in the dining area could hear Sunny working away.

Dishes came out in consistent sputters. Some tables took it upon themselves to pitch in, clearing up their own dishes. Others wrote down their order on the napkins and walked it up to the counter, as Sunny rushed out with another load of noodle dishes, his shirt drenched from a combination of dishwashing liquid, perspiration, spilled broth, and soy sauce. Other guests patiently waited, so they could pay their bill (to Sunny the cashier).

After about two hours, the family of five finished their last dish, satiated from all the good food and happy to have been able to lend a hand.

As the one who ordered the extra plate of dumplings, I must say I was impressed. They say it takes a village to raise a child. The same might be said for Sunny’s restaurant on that cold, rainy day.

Oh, and everyone lived happily ever after. (end)

Wayne Chan can be reached at info@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in Column: Wayne's Worlds, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Japanese girl delighted by bottle found in Hawaii, reconnects with old friends

Japanese girl delighted by bottle found in Hawaii, reconnects with old friends

By Mari Yamaguchi
The Associated Press

TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese teenager expressed her gratitude Sunday after a U.S. sailor in Hawaii found a bottle she had tossed into the sea off Japan’s southern coast as a child, and said she was delighted to be reconnected with her old classmates as a result. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Indonesian massacre widows welcome Dutch ruling

By Sri Kusmiati
The Associated Press

RAWAGEDEH, Indonesia (AP) — Widows of villagers executed by Dutch soldiers during Indonesia’s bloody battle for independence from colonial rule more than six decades ago quietly welcomed news that they were entitled to compensation. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

China’s unhealthy habits drive chronic diseases up

China’s unhealthy habits drive chronic diseases up

By Gillian Wong
The Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) — During a recent weekday lunch, middle-aged Wu Zhixin had a plate of shredded pork noodles glistening with oil and washed it down with a paper cup of vodka-like alcohol. Then she lit a cigarette. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30, World NewsComments (0)

Thai court to military: transsexuals not ill

By Thanyarat Doksone
The Associated Press

BANGKOK (AP) — A court in Thailand ordered the military last week to stop labeling transgender people as being mentally ill in a decision praised by activists. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30, World NewsComments (0)

Vera and Joey Ing, Cynthia del Rosario to be awarded at MAP breakfast

Vera and Joey Ing, Cynthia del Rosario to be awarded at MAP breakfast

Joey and Vera Ing (left) and Cynthia del Rosario

The University of Washington Alumni Association (UWAA) Multicultural Alumni Partnership (MAP) is holding the 17th Annual MAP Bridging the Gap Scholarship Breakfast on Saturday, Oct. 29, in the Cascade Room at Haggett Hall on the UW Seattle campus. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Does preference for Asian boys exist in the U.S.?

Does preference for Asian boys exist in the U.S.?

By Jean Wong
Northwest Asian Weekly

Image by Stacy Nguyen/NWAW

“My father (Chinese-born in the Philippines) says he never had a preference on what gender his kids would be, but I heard my mother, [who passed away when I was a year old], really wanted to have a son,” said Johanna Martinez, a Filipino-Chinese American student of International Studies at the University of Washington. Read the full story

Posted in Features, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (3)

City of Bellevue and Sound Transit clash over light rail

City of Bellevue and Sound Transit clash over light rail

By Tiffany Ran
Northwest Asian Weekly

Image of I-90 with an illustration of potential East Link light rail (Image provided by Sound Transit)

Scott Rodgers, a CPA who works from home, can look out the window and see the neighboring Hilton Hotel and Bellevue Club. However, the view outside his window is set to change. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

Hold up with new federal financial bureau may harm communities of color

Hold up with new federal financial bureau may harm communities of color

By Stacy Nguyen
Northwest Asian Weekly

Image by Stacy Nguyen/NWAW

New 2010 Census data show that the housing bust has hit some communities of color the hardest. Read the full story

Posted in Business, Community News, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (2)

Duc Tran: a savvy business owner who saw opportunity and took it

Duc Tran: a savvy business owner who saw opportunity and took it

By Jason Cruz
Northwest Asian Weekly

Duc Tran (Photo from onlyinseattle.org)

Duc Tran’s parents owned a grocery store, so maybe it’s not a surprise that Tran also became a grocery store owner. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Profiles, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (4)

EDITORIAL: Kids, stop taking your folks for granted

Parents, as you prepare your kids for a new school year, it’s important to realize that your child will look around the cafeteria and see a the kind of variety that we adults didn’t see when we were in school. Read the full story

Posted in Editorials, Vol 30 No 39 | 9/24-9/30Comments (0)

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