Tag Archive | "Vol 28 No 44 | October 24 – October 30"

After many years, Eatonville citizens reunite with former classmate, an interned Japanese American

After many years, Eatonville citizens reunite with former classmate, an interned Japanese American

Eatonville residents rush to greet Bill and Ruth Akiyoshi (right and middle) after the parade had ended. Bill grew up in Eatonvill but never returned to live there again after he was interned during WWII.

Eatonville residents rush to greet Bill and Ruth Akiyoshi (right and middle) after the parade had ended. Bill grew up in Eatonvill but never returned to live there again after he was interned during WWII. (Photos by Vivian Miezianko/NWAW)

By Vivian Miezianko
Northwest Asian Weekly

On the morning of Saturday, Oct. 17, Eatonville, Wash., celebrated its centenary with a parade.

Among the riders were Japanese American couple William (Bill) and Ruth Akiyoshi of Whittier, Calif. On the doors of their car were two placards that said, “Welcome Home, Bill Akiyoshi.” Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Profiles, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Thomas Hong

Thomas Hong

The new assistant conductor of the Seattle Symphony

By Yuki Nakajima
Northwest Asian Weekly

Thomas Hong

Thomas Hong

A person has to have musical knowledge, precise conducting, formidable technique, and a great personality in order to become a Seattle Symphony assistant conductor.

When auditions were held last year, there was one candidate that met all of the requirements.

His name is Thomas Hong. Hong was selected as the new Seattle Symphony’s Douglas F. King Assistant Conductor after more than 100 candidates sent in their applications.

The duty of an assistant conductor is to back up the guest conductor. The assistant conductor also conducts concerts, especially concerts in neighborhoods, for families and for educational purposes. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Profiles, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Smooth Operator: Korean American wins WEC Title

Smooth Operator: Korean American wins WEC Title

Korean American wins WEC Title

Ben Henderson defeats Shane Roller in a WEC fight on April 5.(Photo by Josh Hedges/WEC Productions, LLC)

Ben Henderson defeats Shane Roller in a WEC fight on April 5.(Photo by Josh Hedges/WEC Productions, LLC)

By Jason Cruz
Northwest Asian Weekly

“Decatur Gator, baby!” shouted Ben Henderson into the phone during a recent interview before his championship fight. Henderson’s message is a familiar chant from his Federal Way alma mater. A former Decatur High School wrestling standout, Korean American Henderson won the World Extreme Cagefighting (WEC) interim lightweight title on Oct. 10 in San Antonio, Texas. WEC is owned by the Ultimate Fight Championship (UFC). With only three years of experience in Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), the 25-year-old is heading to the top.

Born in Colorado Springs, Colo., Henderson’s family moved to Tacoma when he was in the first grade. At Decatur High School, he was a standout wrestler. Henderson’s abilities earned him a scholarship at The Dana College outside of Omaha, Neb. After graduating, Henderson served as a volunteer coach for his school while applying to become a police officer. Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (6)

Highline the most diverse community college in the state?

By Vivian Luu
Northwest Asian Weekly

There has been a push for diversity to bolster Highline Community College’s (HCC) academic environment, claim students and faculty, citing the institution’s members of color, consideration for ethnicity in hiring new faculty and staff, as well as what some claim to be an openness that fosters different backgrounds. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Education, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (4)

Gates launches Center for Asian Art and Ideas

Gates launches Center for Asian Art and Ideas

By Irfan Shariff
Northwest Asian Weekly

Mimi Gardner Gates

Mimi Gardner Gates

The Seattle Art Museum, the University of Washington (UW), and Mimi Gardner Gates launched the opening of the Gardner Center for Asian Art and Ideas (CAAI) this month with a 10-part lecture series at the Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAAM).

The series, “Saturday University at SAAM: Asia in Focus,” introduces various topics in Asian history, art, and culture.

“We all have different knowledge about Asia. Many people are curious and want to know more,” said Gates, who received her doctorate in Asian art at Yale University. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Profiles, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Pioneers given honors for speaking the universal language: music

Pioneers given honors for speaking the universal language: music

Ten musicians were awarded the distinction of being Northwest Asian Weekly Foundation’s 2009 Asian American Pioneers in Music. Many of the pioneers came together on Oct. 16 to perform together across ethnic lines. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Ten musicians were awarded the distinction of being Northwest Asian Weekly Foundation’s 2009 Asian American Pioneers in Music. Many of the pioneers came together on Oct. 16 to perform together across ethnic lines. (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

By James Tabafunda
Northwest Asian Weekly

For some in the performing arts, rhythm, melody, and lyrics combine to create an art form unmatched by its power to entertain and stir intense emotions. These individuals have managed to merge their passions with their rich cultural heritage. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Action-packed “Ong-Bak 2” doesn’t disappoint

Action-packed “Ong-Bak 2” doesn’t disappoint

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

At age 33, Thailand’s Tony Jaa seems poised to replace Jackie Chan in the world of Asian martial arts film. Like Jackie Chan, Jaa’s movies emphasize all-natural fights and stunts. They avoid the use of computer graphics and stuntman substitutions for the leading man.

Jaa, 22 years younger than Chan, has yet to break the majority of bones in his body. He remains, for the moment, young, strong, and up to the formidable challenges of his work.

The plot of the first “Ong-Bak” was quite simple. Jaa plays a humble marital arts student in a small Thai town. Gangsters steal the head of the town’s Buddha statue.

Jaa spends the entire film trying to get the head back. In the film, there are plenty of wild stunts and bad-guy punch-outs.

The new installment takes Jaa back almost 600 years, to 1421. He plays the role of Tien, a nobleman’s son.

Tien loses his father to assassins. A bandit leader adopts and raises him. As an adult, he must discover the truth about his father’s death and seeks vengeance.

When Tien resists becoming a slave, the slave master dumps him into a filthy and slimy pit. He soon discovers that he isn’t alone in the pit. A crocodile breaks the surface, going straight for Tien’s throat.

Later, after Tien escapes the pit and routs the slavers, the slave master crawls on the ground, begging for his life. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (1)

NWAW’s October book recommendations

NWAW’s October book recommendations

By Samantha Pak
Northwest Asian Weekly

“The Scent of Sake”
By Joyce Lebra
HarperCollins, 2009

“Let a woman enter the brewery and the sake will go sour.”

All her life, Rie has heard these words. But as the sole heir to the House of Omura, one of the most respected families of sake brewers in Kobe, Japan, she knows she must learn as much as possible about the trade in order to carry on the tradition.

Unfortunately, things are not that simple in 19th century Japan. In this male-dominated society, Rie learns from her mother that she must “kill the self,” swallow her feelings, and push her personal desires aside. This becomes especially true when her parents arrange for her to marry Jihei, the son of another brewing family. Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Johjima opts out of last 2 years of contract

Johjima opts out of last 2 years of contract

By Gregg Bell
The Associated Press

Kenji Johjima

Kenji Johjima

SEATTLE (AP) — The Mariners’ experiment of having the first Japanese catcher in the major leagues has ended two years early.

Kenji Johjima opted out of the final two seasons and $15.8 million of his contract, allowing him to sign with a Japanese team.

Seattle general manager Jack Zduriencik said Monday the decision came somewhat unexpectedly over the weekend, and that it was solely Johjima’s.

Zduriencik said the Mariners did not pay any money to buy out their former starting catcher, who said last season he was struggling to accept Seattle benching him in favor of rookie Rob Johnson.

Johjima’s contract gave him the right to end it by Nov. 15 for the purpose of finishing his career in Japan. He gave up salaries of $7.7 million next year and $8.1 million in 2011.

“After lots of very deep thought and deliberation, I have decided to return home to resume my career in Japan,” Johjima said in a statement. “I have had a wonderful experience competing at the major league level. The last four years have been extraordinary, with great teammates and great coaches. I will always be indebted to the Mariners organization for giving me the opportunity to follow my dream.

“This was a very difficult decision, both professionally and personally. I feel now is the time to go home, while I still can perform at a very high level.” Read the full story

Posted in Sports, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Women with diabetes at increased risk for irregular heart rhythm

Diabetes increases the risk of women developing atrial fibrillation (AF) by 26 percent. Atrial fibrillation is a potentially dangerous irregular heart rhythm that can lead to stroke, heart failure, and chronic fatigue.  These are the findings of a new Kaiser Permanente study, published in the October issue of Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (1)

Taiwanese pop band tours U.S., will perform in Seattle

Taiwanese pop band tours U.S., will perform in Seattle

Won Fu bandmembers

Won Fu bandmembers

Taiwanese pop band Won Fu is visiting the West Coast this month. The tour is part of a cultural initiative to promote the island’s popular culture overseas via music. In addition to introducing Taiwan’s music to foreign audiences, the Taiwan government sponsors bands to perform abroad in order to further inspire their creativity and growth. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (2)

Gardening workshops now available in Vietnamese and Spanish

Almost 70 percent of workers in the landscaping trade are non-English speakers, according to the Washington Association of Landscape Professionals. To reach this audience, Seattle Public Utilities conducts annual green gardening workshops in Spanish and Vietnamese to teach landscaping professionals how to use environmentally-friendly landscaping and yard care techniques. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (2)

Vietnamese musicians learn from a Japanese American master

Vietnamese musicians learn from a Japanese American master

By Ben Stocking
The Associated Press

Alan Gilbert

Alan Gilbert

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — The conductor of the New York Philharmonic wielded his baton as an instrument of diplomacy on Oct. 15. His words, however, weren’t all sweet.

“You’ve learned the rhythm wrong!” Alan Gilbert told students at the Hanoi Conservatory of Music as they struggled through a tough section of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony. “It’s just wrong!”

America’s oldest orchestra performs in Vietnam for the first time this week as part of an Asian tour that has included stops in Tokyo and Seoul. The Philharmonic played Beethoven’s Seventh on Oct. 16 and Oct. 17 at Hanoi’s ornate 590-seat opera house, which is nearly a century old.

Gilbert, the 42-year-old conductor who took over the orchestra last month, held the students to his usual high standards during a master class, part of the Philharmonic’s outreach during the tour. Gilbert’s father is Caucasian and his mother is Japanese. They both had careers as violinists in the Philharmonic. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

Fong not intimidated in run for Iowa governor

Fong not intimidated in run for Iowa governor

By Mike Glover
The Associated Press

Christian Fong

Christian Fong

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Christian Fong isn’t easily intimidated.

The 32-year-old Cedar Rapids businessman is running for the Republican nomination for governor despite never holding public office and competing against several more experienced candidates, likely including a four-term governor. Then comes the prospect of trying to defeat an incumbent governor, an achievement not accomplished since 1962.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Fong said the key is the “next generation” of younger voters that President Barack Obama energized in his campaign. Those voters, Fong said, view the world outside the prism of traditional party politics, instead thinking more in generational terms. Read the full story

Posted in National News, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (1)

India’s natural gas tied up in $17B family feud

India’s natural gas tied up in $17B family feud

By ERIKA KINETZ
The Associated Press

Mukesh Ambani (left) and Anil Ambani

Mukesh Ambani (left) and Anil Ambani

MUMBAI, India (AP) — An ashen Anil Ambani, one of the world’s richest men, stood before a clutter of television cameras, close to tears. “There is only pain, hurt, and emotion,” he said.

There is also, by some calculations, at least $17 billion at stake.

Anil and his brother Mukesh — ranked by Forbes magazine as the world’s 34th and 7th richest individuals — are locked in an increasingly bitter fight over India’s biggest natural gas deposit.

The battle between the famous sons of one of India’s first great capitalists has quickly become the nation’s favorite family feud. It has also exposed flaws in the government’s management of the crucial energy sector and the cozy relationship between officials and one of India’s wealthiest families. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30, World NewsComments (0)

China, Vietnam pledge to deal with border disputes

BEIJING (AP) — The prime ministers of China and Vietnam pledged on Oct. 16 to handle border disputes between their countries peacefully, amid deep suspicion among some Vietnamese over Beijing’s intentions. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30, World NewsComments (0)

Rising seas threaten Shanghai and other major cities

By Elaine Kurtenbach
The Associated Press

SHANGHAI (AP) — This city of 20 million rose from the sea and grew into a modern showcase, with skyscrapers piercing the clouds, atop tidal flats fed by the mighty Yangtze River. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30, World NewsComments (0)

Blog: A triple celebration for the local Indian community

Blog: A triple celebration for the local Indian community

Jay Inslee (left), Jim Dermott (right), and the Ambassador of India Meera Shankar (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Jay Inslee (left), Jim Dermott (right), and the Ambassador of India Meera Shankar (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Congratulations to the Indian community for installing the statue of Mahatma Gandhi on Oct. 17 at the Bellevue Library. The idea of the statue and its location couldn’t be more perfect, as the Indian community has grown immensely since Microsoft started hiring many software engineers from India. Installing it at a library is also appropriate because it symbolizes a high ground for information, ideas, and ideals. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (2)

Opinion: Northwest Asian Weekly endorses the following candidates:

Opinion: Northwest Asian Weekly endorses the following candidates:

King County Executive
Dow Constantine

We are endorsing Dow Constantine because of his proven record of reforming King County. He brings with him experience and education. Constantine has the credentials: a law degree and a degree in urban planning.

His opponent, Susan Hutchison, lacks  experience, has been vague about her affiliation with the Republican Party, and has failed to answer critical questions about how she would lead King County. Read the full story

Posted in Opinion, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (1)

Opinion: Northwest Asian Weekly endorses the following Asian Americans:

Opinion: Northwest Asian Weekly endorses the following Asian Americans:

Patsy Bonincontri
City of Bellevue, Council Position No. 4

Patsy Bonincontri has served on the Bellevue City Council since 1998. She earned her bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Southern California. She would like to continue to advocate for improving the quality of life in Bellevue, invest in human capital, and upgrade its infrastructure to support anticipated growth. Read the full story

Posted in Opinion, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-30Comments (0)

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