Tag Archive | "vol 27 no 39 | September 20 – September 26"

Workers refuse to bow down to Boeing

Workers refuse to bow down to Boeing

Jane Mee Wong
Northwest Asian Weekly

“We need more job security, more raises and benefits,” said female Korean American Lee*, 43, an electrician at the Everett-based Boeing plant. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, National News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Asians come together to empower

Asians come together to empower

By Stacy Nguyen
Northwest Asian Weekly

Looking for something to do the weekend of Sept. 26? It may be a little difficult to choose between the National Federation of Filipino American Associations’ (NaFFAA) 8th Empowerment Conference and the Korean American Coalition (KAC) 6th Annual National Convention, which begins on Thursday, Sept. 25. These conventions are to be held at the Westin Hotels in Seattle and Bellevue, respectively. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Lensey Namioka: Pioneer in Publishing

Lensey Namioka: Pioneer in Publishing

Lensey Namioka is a woman of many talents, but with a great passion. Now a unique storyteller, Namioka started off in mathematics. “I realized early that I wasn’t going to do any original, creative work in math,” she said. “At first, I did some translation of Chinese mathematics into English, but that was kind of boring so I started writing articles, humorous articles at first.”

On being honored as an Asian American pioneer in publishing, Namioka slyly said, “Gee, I’m not sure in what way I’m a pioneer. Well, maybe, I was one of the first to have a book published in English for young people that has a Japanese samurai detective. I can’t think in what other way I’m a pioneer, but it is a great honor!” ♦

Meet Lensey Namioka on Oct. 11 at China Harbor Restaurant, 2040 Westlake Ave. N., Seattle. She is one of Northwest Asian Weekly’s nine honorees for the Asian American Pioneer Dinner. Tickets are $60 per person before Oct. 5, $75 after. For more information, please e-mail rsvp@nwasianweekly.com.

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Wedding Bells

Wedding Bells

Susan Ulep and Hao Kung celebrated their Aug. 16 nuptials in Hawaii. The couple and their guests of family and friends wore leis during the ceremony.

Susan Ulep and Hao Kung were married on Aug. 16 on the big island of Hawaii. Ulep, currently a project engineer for Skanska Building, is an alum student of the NWAW’s Summer Youth Leadership Program and is a past NWAW board member. Kung is currently working at Microsoft as a software developer. The pair celebrated their big day with 70 of their closest friends and family. Ulep and Kung incorporated various Hawaiian, Chinese, Filipino and Western wedding traditions. ♦

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

A good cause

A good cause

In a group photo of the luncheon on Sept. 4, Phyllis M. Wise (center) sits with Mona Locke (left) and Carolyn Kelly (right). Grinning broadly, Sue Rahr stands tall (back). Mimi Gardner Gates is not pictured.

NWAW’s publisher Assunta Ng donated a luncheon with some of Washington state’s most powerful women on Sept. 4. Community members paid $200 a piece to share a table with director of the Seattle Art Museum Mimi Gardner Gates, president and chief operating officer of the Seattle Times Carolyn Kelly, executive director of the Susan G. Komen Foundation Mona Locke, King County Sheriff Sue Rahr and University of Washington provost Phyllis M. Wise. At the luncheon, individuals got to pick the brains of these powerful women. The women were asked questions ranging from presidential politics to how they met their significant others.

The proceeds of luncheon — $2600 — went to the Executive Development Institute. ♦

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Going international

Going international

Maria Goodlow-Johnson (center) was all smiles when she visited Beacon Hill Elementary School. School Principal Susan Murphy (right) beams with pride for her students.

Beacon Hill Elementary School celebrates becoming an international school this fall. Beacon Hill is only the third international school in the district joining the John Stanford International School and Hamilton International Middle School.

Led by Principal Susie Murphy, the school offers three key programs: Spanish/English dual language immersion, Chinese Mandarin/English partial immersion and an English language international program. Beacon Hill International School has a diverse student population of 398 students speaking more than 10 different languages. ♦

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Comings & Goings

Comings & Goings

Thao Tran has accepted the position of coordinator for major institutions and schools for the City of Seattle. Formerly, Tran had been working as a temporary employee since April.

Prior to working for the City of Seattle, Tran served as a business assistance officer for the Rainier Valley Community Development Fund, as executive director of the Vietnamese American Economic Development Association and as owner of his own consulting business. ♦

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Comings & Goings

Comings & Goings

Thao Tran has accepted the position of coordinator for major institutions and schools for the City of Seattle. Formerly, Tran had been working as a temporary employee since April.

Prior to working for the City of Seattle, Tran served as a business assistance officer for the Rainier Valley Community Development Fund, as executive director of the Vietnamese American Economic Development Association and as owner of his own consulting business. ♦

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, NewsComments (0)

Fundraising

Fundraising

Inter*Im executive director Hyeok Kim (left) and ICDA board president Gary Iwamoto pose for a picture at the gala on Sept. 4

The Inter*Im Community Association had an annual gala dinner and live auction Sept. 4. It was new executive director Hyeok Kim’s first dinner as part of staff. They ended up raising over $114,000.

Some of the varied items up for auction were desserts, fly fishing lessons and getaway packages. The proceeds of the fundraiser will go towards Inter*Im projects such as the upcoming Samaki Commons Family Housing and The Green Street Project. ♦

Posted in Community News, Names in the News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Local bartenders pour out new niche

Local bartenders pour out new niche

Ivan Chew shows off his flair in a competition at Battle in Seattle 3, Aug. 13. (Photos by Caroline Li)

By Caroline Li
Northwest Asian Weekly

On Wednesday, Aug. 13, guests at the Lake Union Armory got more than the usual quick drink at the bar. Glass bottles were spun, tossed and juggled, all in an effort to impress guests and take a shot at winning $15,000 in prize money at Battle in Seattle 3, presented by DList magazine. Battle in Seattle 3 is a bartending contest that put the best flair bartenders from around the world head to head in a competition. Read the full story

Posted in Business, Community News, Features, News, Profiles, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Seattle Artist makes dishware that won’t last

Seattle Artist makes dishware that won’t last

www.diemchau.com

"Still Trying" is made of porcelain cups and saucers, toothpicks and paper.

By Catherine Spangler
Northwest Asian Weekly

Diem Chau does not make art to last. Her embroidered chinaware is delicate and gauzy. Eventually the threads will disintegrate and the colors will fade. This is not by any defect of the materials, but rather in accordance with the artist’s intention to represent the ephemeral nature of memories.

Chau’s Chinese Vietnamese family came to the U.S. from Vietnam as refugees in 1986 when she was 7 years old. Her memories are precious proof of her family’s existence through hardship and changing landscapes. Old photographs of her late father in his youth have been the inspiration for many of her paintings in the past. Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Community News, Features, Features, News, Profiles, Profiles, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

IAWW honors Mimi Gates and Bill Gates Sr.

The India Association of Western Washington (IAWW) is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. The association decided to celebrate this occasion by including other mainstream and local Asian communities and honoring their leaders who have been instrumental in building bridges across all communities for years. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (1)

Western Union helps Laotians retain culture

The Western Union Company, known for its money transfer services, is supporting programs that help immigrants adapt to their new American life as well as preserve and honor their ethnic heritage. Western Union has announced its sponsorship of the Lao Highland Association’s (LHA) Mien language program at a kickoff event that was held at LHA’s office in Seattle. The program, designed for Laotian Americans, is an opportunity to learn or improve Mien language skills and gain a greater knowledge of Lao’s rich cultural heritage. It is open to all who are interested. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Search is on for new AAJA executive director

The Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) seeks an executive director responsible for the national, non-profit organization’s $1.2 million budget and $2 million endowment campaign. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Tour renovated libraries with a ‘passport’!

The Seattle Public Library invites the public to tour all 26 new and remodeled branches and the spectacular Central Library with a commemorative library passport available at the International District/Chinatown Branch, 713 Eighth Ave. S., and all other library locations beginning Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

New temporary office hours for Downtown Neighborhood Service Center

Due to the relocation of the Downtown Neighborhood Service Center, biweekly office hours in the International District were discontinued, effective as of Monday, Aug. 25. The office is relocating to Pioneer Square. Read the full story

Posted in Briefs, Community News, News, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Cage film has too much bang and little else

Cage film has too much bang and little else

By Andrew Hamlin
Northwest Asian Weekly

The Pang brothers turned in a credible grimy thriller with 1999′s original “Bangkok Dangerous.” Eight years later, only the brothers and the city remain the same. Western screenwriter Jason Richman took the Pangs’ original and pumped up the volume, the budget and the violence, losing most of the pathos in the stampede.

The 1999 film, shot mostly in Thailand’s capitol, followed a deaf and mute gunman, Kong (Pawalit Mongkolpisit), as he scoured the streets with his gun and his assignments, a dirty sweaty man with a dirty sweaty job who collected dirty sweaty money and reposed, between pulls of the trigger, in a dirty sweaty one-and-a-half-room abode shared with Jo (Pisek Intrakanchit).

Jo and a stripper Aom (Patharawarin Timkul) met Kong at a shooting range one day, befriended him and invited him to pop off a few rounds. Nobody had bothered to try and communicate with the young deaf fellow before. Kong found, in one of the Pangs’ overdone but crudely touching moments, that he could shoot quite well visualizing his childhood tormentors at the heart of the target. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Reviews, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Communication goes beyond language in Wang film

Communication goes beyond language in Wang film

By N.P. Thompson
Northwest Asian Weekly

Vida Ghahremani and Henry O from a scene in "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers," directed by Wayne Wang. (Photo provided by Magnolia Pictures)

Filmed in Spokane, Wash., Wayne Wang’s new film “A Thousand Years of Good Prayers” marks the director’s return both to independent filmmaking and to telling stories about the Chinese experience in America.

Wang made a name for himself with “Chan is Missing” in 1982, a low-budget feature about a couple of Asian American cabbies circling San Francisco’s Chinatown in search of the mutual friend who robbed them. For the next decade, culminating in a 1993 adaptation of Amy Tan’s novel “The Joy Luck Club,” Wang brought Asian-themed domestic chronicles from art houses to the mainstream.

In recent years, however, he drifted into ill-received commercial ventures (among them, the Queen Latifah remake of the ’50s British comedy “Last Holiday”) but now comes full circle with this small-scale study of an estranged father and daughter reuniting. Read the full story

Posted in At the Movies, Reviews, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (1)

Novel deals with suicide, abuse, and the legacy of being Japanese American

Novel deals with suicide, abuse, and the legacy of being Japanese American

By Calton Breen
Northwest Asian Weekly

Working within the emotionally associative forms of poetry and memoir, award-winning poet David Mura has already created a body of work that tackles head-on complex issues such as sexual desire and addiction, race relations and the unspoken consequences of U.S. WWII internment camps on later generations of Japanese Americans. Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

Vote!

The prevalent angle that much of the media has been spinning in the presidential election is their stress on the fact that, next year, we will either have a Black president or a female vice president. Either way – isn’t it fantastic how far we’ve come? Read the full story

Posted in Editorials, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/26Comments (0)

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