Tag Archive | "John Kwak"

Giving back: the secret to the successes of Pioneers in Social Entrepreneurship

Giving back: the secret to the successes of Pioneers in Social Entrepreneurship

By Stacy Nguyen
Northwest Asian Weekly

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/30_44/pion_headtable.JPG

The Pioneers honorees and their guests (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Today, pioneers don’t hate to don coonskin hats to blaze trails. In fact, they come in all sorts of garb. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Vol 30 No 44 | 10/29-11/4Comments (0)

BLOG: Even after a car accident, Sen. Shin serious about commitments

BLOG: Even after a car accident, Sen. Shin serious about commitments

By Assunta Ng

John Kwak (left) with Sen. Paull Shin (Photo by George Liu/NWAW)

Last Saturday, after attending the White House dinner in Washington, D.C., to honor President of the Republic of South Korea Lee Myung-Bak, Sen. Paull Shin rushed back to Seattle to attend Northwest Asian Weekly’s Pioneer Awards gala at the China Harbor Restaurant.

What the emcee didn’t say and what the audience didn’t know was that Shin was involved in a car accident before he arrived. He hit a concrete wall. Shin was fine, besides being a little dizzy.

The damage to his car is estimated at $10,000. I suspect that he was exhausted after a hectic trip.

Shin could have skipped the Pioneer Awards dinner with a good reason. But he didn’t.

He had committed to coming and watching two of his good friends, John Kwak and Kenny Lee, receive their Asian American Pioneer Awards. Shin’s promises are golden. Read the full story

Posted in Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 30 No 43 | 10/22-10/28Comments (0)

John Kwak: A not-yet-ready-to-retire business owner and Korean community leader

John Kwak: A not-yet-ready-to-retire business owner and Korean community leader

By Eleanor Lee
Northwest Asian Weekly

John Kwak (Photo by Eleanor Lee/NWAW)

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Kwak immigrated to Seattle from South Korea in 1973. In Korea, he participated in the pro-democracy movement against a totalitarian regime, first as a student and then as a professor of education at Korea University. He was primarily a speechwriter, as he did not like to speak in front of crowds himself. However, he was able to articulate ideas for others. Eventually, his activities brought him to the attention of the government, and he was asked to desist. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Profiles, Vol 30 No 35 | 8/27-9/2Comments (2)

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