Tag Archive | "Aung San Suu Kyi"

Suu Kyi visit highlights Japan’s economic push in Myanmar

Suu Kyi visit highlights Japan’s economic push in Myanmar

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Aung San Suu Kyi

By Elaine Kurtenbach
AP Business Writer

TOKYO, Japan (AP) — Japan’s long-deferred aspirations for a larger role in Myanmar are getting a boost this coming week with a visit by Nobel Peace Prize laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

The visit by Suu Kyi, in Japan for the first time in 27 years, is highlighting Japan’s interest in helping to craft a blueprint for Myanmar’s economy and tapping its growth potential. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 17 | 4/20-4/26, World NewsComments (1)

Myanmar opposition party to hold party congress

Myanmar opposition party to hold party congress

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Aung San Suu Kyi

By Aye Aye Win
THE Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — In another sign of political reform and reconciliation in Myanmar, the country’s biggest party, led by opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, will hold its first-ever congress in the country’s former capital next week.

“This will be the NLD’s first party congress since the party was formed more than 24 years ago,” National League for Democracy senior leader and parliamentarian Ohn Kyaing said Sunday, March 3. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 32 No 11 | 3/9-3/15, World NewsComments (0)

Aung San Suu Kyi visits US as Myanmar releases prisoners

Aung San Suu Kyi visits US as Myanmar releases prisoners

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Aung San Suu Kyi

By Matthew Pennington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON (AP) — Myanmar democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, renowned for her peaceful struggle against military rule, began a marathon tour of the United States on Monday, Sept. 17, the latest milestone in her remarkable journey from political prisoner to globe-trotting stateswoman. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 31 No 39 | 9/22-9/28, World NewsComments (2)

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi hopes victory is dawn of new era

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi hopes victory is dawn of new era

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Aung San Suu Kyi (Photo by Khin Maung Win/AP)

By Todd Pittman
Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) ― Democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi’s victory in parliamentary elections is the biggest prize of her political career. But the weekend vote for only a few dozen legislative seats may have sown the seeds of something far more significant ― the possibility her party could sweep the next balloting in 2015 and take control of Myanmar’s government.

That, for now, remains only a tantalizing dream for her supporters, and making it happen in three years’ time may be unrealistic in a nation still heavily influenced by a feared military, whose powers and influence remain enshrined in the constitution.

Still, hope for installing a truly free government hasn’t run this high in decades. “We hope this will be the beginning of a new era,” a beaming 66-year-old Suu Kyi said in a brief victory speech Monday, one day after the by-election in which her National League for Democracy party won almost all of the 44 seats it contested. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 31 No 15 | 4/7-4/13, World NewsComments (0)

Obama, Clinton gamble on Myanmar

Obama, Clinton gamble on Myanmar

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Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (left) and Aung San Suu Kyi

By Matthew Lee
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is taking a foreign policy gamble by sending Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on a historic trip to the isolated Southeast Asian nation of Myanmar this week.

The administration is betting that the first visit to the country, also known as Burma, by a secretary of state in more than half a century will pay dividends, including loosening Chinese influence in a region where America and its allies are wary of China’s rise.

But it will also gauge the Myanmar government’s baby steps toward democratic reform after 50 years of military rule that saw brutal crackdowns on pro-democracy activists, including the detention of opposition leader and Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi.

Clinton left Washington on Monday and spent two days in Myanmar after a stop in South Korea. After talks with government officials in Myanmar’s capital of Naypyitaw on Thursday, she will see Suu Kyi on Friday in a meeting that will likely be the highlight of the visit.

Suu Kyi, who intends to run for parliament in upcoming by-elections, has welcomed Clinton’s trip and told President Barack Obama in a phone call earlier this month that engagement with the government would be positive. Clinton has called Suu Kyi a personal inspiration.

The trip is the first major development in U.S.–Myanmar relations in decades and comes after the Obama administration launched a new effort to prod reforms in 2009 with a package of carrot-and-stick incentives. The rapprochement sped up when Myanmar held elections last year that brought a new government to power that pledged greater openness. The administration’s special envoy to Myanmar has made three trips to the country in the past three months, and the top U.S. diplomat for human rights has made one.

Those officials pushed for Clinton to make the trip, deeming a test of the reforms as worthwhile despite the risks of backsliding.

President Thein Sein, a former army officer, has pushed forward reforms after Myanmar experienced decades of repression under successive military regimes that canceled 1990 elections that Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party won.

Last week, Myanmar’s parliament approved a law guaranteeing the right to protest, which had not previously existed. Improvements have been made in areas such as media, Internet access, and political participation. The NLD, which had boycotted previous flawed elections, is now registered as a party.

But the government that took office in March is still dominated by a military-proxy political party, and Myanmar’s commitment to democratization and its willingness to limit its close ties with China are uncertain.

Corruption runs rampant, hundreds of political prisoners are still jailed, and violent ethnic conflicts continue in the country’s north and east. And, although the government suspended a controversial Chinese dam project earlier this year, China laid down a marker ahead of Clinton’s trip by sending its vice president to meet the head of Myanmar’s armed forces.

China’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement that Vice President Xi Jinping pledged to maintain strong ties with Myanmar and encouraged Gen. Min Aung Hlaing to push for solutions to unspecified challenges in relations.

Myanmar also remains subject to tough sanctions that prohibit Americans and U.S. companies from most commercial transactions in the country.

U.S. officials say Clinton’s trip is a fact-finding visit and will not result in an easing of sanctions. But officials also say that such steps could be taken if Myanmar proves itself to be serious about reform. (end)

Posted in Vol 30 No 49 | 12/3-12/9, World NewsComments (0)

Myanmar deports Michelle Yeoh over Suu Kyi movie

Myanmar deports Michelle Yeoh over Suu Kyi movie

Michelle Yeoh (left) and Aung San Suu Kyi

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — The military-backed government of Myanmar has deported Hollywood actress Michelle Yeoh, who stars as pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi in an upcoming movie, officials said last Tuesday.

The Malaysian actress arrived in the country’s main city, Yangon, on June 22 and was deported the same day because she was on a blacklist, a government official said. Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, Features, Profiles, Vol 30 No 27 | 7/2-7/8Comments (0)

Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi welcomes U.S. envoy nomination

Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi welcomes U.S. envoy nomination

Aung San Suu Kyi

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi says she hopes that a new U.S. special envoy to Myanmar will be able to help usher in true democratic reforms in her country.

President Barack Obama last week nominated Derek Mitchell, a defense official and Asia expert, as U.S. special envoy to Myanmar. He would have the tough job of negotiating with its military dominated government and pushing for reform. The post still needs to be confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 30 No 17 | 4/23-4/29, World NewsComments (1)

10 female leaders who’ve made a big difference in the last year

10 female leaders who’ve made a big difference in the last year

Image by Stacy Nguyen/NWAW

By Yukari Sumino
Northwest Asian Weekly

For International Women’s Day, we wanted to compile a list of amazing women around the globe who have made a significant impact in their countries and the world. This list is, by no means, comprehensive, and the women are not ranked. Rather, we want to give a sample of powerful females that you may not have heard very much about, but who have been doing great work. Read the full story

Posted in Community News, Features, Vol 30 No 11 | 3/12-3/18, World NewsComments (1)

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi seeks to revive political party

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi seeks to revive political party

Aung San Suu Kyi

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi began the nuts and bolts work of reviving her political movement Monday, consulting lawyers about having her now-disbanded party declared legal again.

Suu Kyi was released over the weekend from seven and a half years in detention. On Sunday, she told thousands of wildly cheering supporters at the headquarters of her National League for Democracy that she would continue to fight for human rights and the rule of law in the military-controlled nation. Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 47 | 11/20-11/26, World NewsComments (0)

Editorial: Finding inspiration in Aung San Suu Kyi

Editorial: Finding inspiration in Aung San Suu Kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi

Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi was released from house arrest on Nov. 13. She has been detained for 15 of the past 21 years. Her release came six days after Myanmar (Burma)’s first election since 1990. The Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) — the junta’s party — won more than 75 percent of seats in the election, which has been criticized as being rigged. Read the full story

Posted in Editorials, Vol 29 No 47 | 11/20-11/26Comments (0)

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