Archive | On the Shelf

NWAW’s October book recommendations

NWAW’s October book recommendations

All her life, Rie has heard these words. But as the sole heir to the House of Omura, one of the most respected families of sake brewers in Kobe, Japan, she knows she must learn as much as possible about the trade in order to carry on the tradition.

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 28 No 44 | 10/24-300 Comments

NWAW’s monthly must-reads

NWAW’s monthly must-reads

A girl learns book-smarts isn’t everything, a boy learns basketball isn’t everything, and a dragon and goldfish befriend a girl

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 28 No 41 | 10/3-10/91 Comment

August book recs: cultural tales for kids

August book recs: cultural tales for kids

“Shining Star: The Anna May Wong Story”
Written by Paula Woo, illustrated by Lin Wang
Lee & Low Books, June 2009

Being Asian American in the early days of show business was not easy.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Vol 28 No 34 | 8/15 - 8/210 Comments

July book recommendations

July book recommendations

“Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes”
By Eleanor Coerr
Dell Publishing, 1977

I remember this book from my childhood, but I have never read it.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 28 No 30 | 7/18 - 7/240 Comments

NWAW’s June must-reads

NWAW’s June must-reads

By Samantha Pak Northwest Asian Weekly “The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya” By Nagaru Tanigawa, published by Little, Brown and Company, April 2009 Almost every kid has moments where he or she wishes that life was a little less ordinary and a little more exciting.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 28 No 24 | 6/6 - 6/120 Comments

NWAW’s May must-reads

NWAW’s May must-reads

By Samantha Pak NORTHWEST ASIAN WEEKLY Editor’s note: At the beginning of the year, we ran a poll on our Web site asking our readers whether they liked our book reviews. Based on the feedback we received, we decided to run a monthly book recommendation list. We hope you enjoy it.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 28 No 21 | 5/16 - 5/220 Comments

Kids: Travel the world through books

Kids: Travel the world through books

By Thi-Le Vo Northwest Asian Weekly When it comes to children’s books, many have the common assumption that these books can’t offer children more than a cute story and pages of colorful illustrations.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 28 No 17 | 4/18 - 4/240 Comments

Far East awkwardly meets Old West ‘Yellowfish’ review

John Keeble’s novel “Yellowfish” begins in the thick fog of San Francisco’s Chinatown. In such a fog, things disappear

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 28 No 3 | 1/10-1/160 Comments

The benefits of being a middle child

The benefits of being a middle child

“I owe my life to two strokes of incredible luck,” writes Sarfraz Manzoor in his memoir. “I was not born female, and I was not the oldest son.” Manzoor discusses his life in a Pakistani immigrant family living in Luton, England. In his father’s rigid household, the first son would follow into the father’s work. The daughter would remain on her best behavior until she found a man to marry.

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Vol 27 No 49 | 11/29 - 12/50 Comments

Nothing learned Kuo novel promotes stereotypes

Nothing learned Kuo novel promotes stereotypes

Alex Kuo’s latest book, “White Jade and Other Stories” rides a rocky divide. Writing from a ChineseAmerican perspective, the short pieces that make up this collection support his personal political agenda. As such his voice does need to be heard, but literature does not sit easy with work that is one-sided, driven by emotion instead of reason and flagrantly guilty of the twin sins of omission and distortion.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Vol 27 No 47 | 11/15-210 Comments

Become a spice master at home

Become a spice master at home

Smell is one of life’s most evocative senses. A whiff of cologne takes me back to a dim-lit street where I walked hand-in-hand with my high school sweetheart; the assault of trassi (Indonesian shrimp paste) on my nostrils recalls the days in my mother’s kitchen as she pounded this pungent paste with chilies and garlic in her weathered stone mortar.

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 44 | 10/25-310 Comments

Gangster Daddy’s Little Girl

Gangster Daddy’s Little Girl

Shoko Tendo grew up a yakuza’s daughter turned into a juvenile delinquent, then a drug addict, then finally a sturdy writer with a compelling memoir. Being daddy’s girl didn’t shield her from much, and her life bore no resemblance to the Western image of a coddled “mafia princess.” Underneath her walking, talking, I-don’t-care exterior is someone who never knew love, security and stability.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 43 | 10/18-241 Comment

Novel closes the generation gap

Novel closes the generation gap

If ever there were a situation where the phrase “you can’t go home again” would apply, it would be in Many Ly’s second novel for young adults, “Roots and Wings.” Though the phrase should probably be altered to “you can go home again, but prepare to be reminded of why you left.”

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 42 | 10/11-170 Comments

Growing Pains — Teacher matures along with her students

Growing Pains — Teacher matures along with her students

Author Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum knows how complicated growing up can be. Her first novel, National Book Award finalist “Madeleine is Sleeping,” explored the turbulent, often surreal world of adolescence. There, Bynum revealed the tragedy that can hide behind the physical or hormonal changes that put an end to childhood. Far too many of us want to stay children, want to stay unformed and unfocused as adults, escaping into a private void we mistakenly call “freedom.”

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 41 | 10/4 - 10/100 Comments

Life lessons through food

Life lessons through food

As expected of the wired Generation X-er I am, I Googled “Serve the People” to find out more about the book and the author. I was a little surprised; what I thought was a cleverly coined book title was actually a political slogan stemming from a speech Mao Zedong delivered on Sept. 8, 1944, in memory of a fellow Communist party member.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 40 | 9/27 - 10/31 Comment

Deadpan Asian female actress looking for work

Deadpan Asian female actress looking for work

Novelist and filmmaker Xiaolu Guo has a wonderfully deadpan sense of humor. This was evident in her previous book, “A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers,” which revealed, in the form of a glossary, a fraught-with-misunderstandings romance between an untutored Chinese peasant girl, who comes to London to study languages, and the bisexual British aesthete whom she meets at the movies. Likewise, Guo’s feature debut as a director, the meta-comedy “How is Your Fish Today?” was a gentle satire about a Beijing hipster trying to succeed as a screenwriter, despite having none of his scripts make it past government censors.

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 40 | 9/27 - 10/30 Comments

Novel deals with suicide, abuse, and the legacy of being Japanese American

Novel deals with suicide, abuse, and the legacy of being Japanese American

Working within the emotionally associative forms of poetry and memoir, award-winning poet David Mura has already created a body of work that tackles head-on complex issues such as sexual desire and addiction, race relations and the unspoken consequences of U.S. WWII internment camps on later generations of Japanese Americans.

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Reviews, Vol 27 No 39 | 9/20 - 9/260 Comments

‘Passage’ is meditative but a little disjointed

‘Passage’ is meditative but a little disjointed

It is a story told in photos, of a childhood growing up in the ghetto of San Francisco’s Chinatown district. Because of a father who was largely absent from the family members’ lives, Foo’s mother worked 10 to 12 hours a day, six or seven days a week, in a sweatshop to support Foo and her five sisters. “Earth Passages: Journey Through Childhood” doubles as an autobiography and collection of nature photographs by author, attorney and activist Lora Jo Foo.

Read the full story

Posted in On the Shelf, Reviews, September 2008, Vol 27 No 37 | 9/6 - 9/120 Comments

Page 41234

Community Calendar

Weekly E-Newsletter

READ NWAW ONLINE!

Follow our tweets

Do you like us?

Photos on flickr