Archive | Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/22

Asian American banks set to rebound from financial crisis?

Asian American banks set to rebound from financial crisis?

Asian Americans started Washington state’s first bank in the 1960s. There are currently close to 10 Asian banks including local, national, and international offices. The Black community still does not have its own bank, and the Latino community founded its Plaza Bank in 2006.

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Posted in Business, Community News, Profiles, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/222 Comments

Skateboard kid becomes a techie, helps design trucks

Skateboard kid becomes a techie, helps design trucks

The Lakota Middle School student, of Filipino and Nigerian ancestry, has been skateboarding for eight years. As he became more skilled, he noticed that most skateboards don’t offer the proper resistance in performing intense feats that he and his friends are capable of.

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Posted in Community News, Profiles, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/223 Comments

High-powered businesswomen to speak on climbing the corporate ladder — their way

High-powered businesswomen to speak on climbing the corporate ladder — their way

However, on Jan. 29 at China Harbor Restaurant in Seattle, men and women of all ages and ethnicities will get a chance to peek into the conference room as powerful women of various backgrounds, who own their own successful businesses or belong to corporations, convene to talk shop — so to speak.

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Posted in Community News, Features, Profiles, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/222 Comments

Lights, camera, ka-ching!

Lights, camera, ka-ching!

Less than a year after two of India’s favorite actors decamped for Miami to film a romantic comedy, Bollywood mega-star Shahrukh Khan is preparing to make the same trip to shoot one of his country’s first big budget superhero movies.

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Posted in National News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/221 Comment

Chinese student disputes police stun gun account

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — A non-English speaking Chinese college student disputes a Eugene police officer’s account of events that led the officer to shoot the student with a Taser stun gun, the student’s lawyer says.

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Posted in National News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

The U.S. dismisses North Korea’s call for peace treaty

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — On Jan. 11, North Korea proposed signing a peace treaty this year to formally end the Korean War, a suggestion that Washington quickly dismissed.

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Posted in Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/22, World News0 Comments

Kids to scavenge in the ID?

Kids to scavenge in the ID?

For about a dozen years, Chinatown International District Business Improvement Area (CIDBIA) staff members have organized the International District’s annual Lunar New Year Celebration.

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Posted in Community News, Cultures, Features, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/221 Comment

2009, a year of dragon’s magic and new opportunities

2009, a year of dragon’s magic and new opportunities

In a year of recession gloom, business closures, and newspapers dying in droves — why are we, a small paper, still here? Why didn’t we fear that Northwest Asian Weekly would be next? Why didn’t we blame the competition that caused us so much grief, such as Craigslist and other Internet advertising? Why do we feel lucky, energized, and strengthened by the economic turmoil?

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Posted in Features, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

Asian American civil rights groups seek disclosure on ‘special interest countries’

On Dec. 14, two Asian American civil rights organizations, the Asian Law Caucus (ALC) and the Asian American Legal Defense Fund (AALDEF), asked the federal government to reveal how Customs and Border Protection agents single out individuals at the border based solely on their national origin.

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Posted in Briefs, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/221 Comment

Editorial: Those massacred for gold get a memorial, 122 years later

Editorial: Those massacred for gold get a memorial, 122 years later

In 1887, more than 30 Chinese gold miners were massacred on the Oregon side of Hells Canyon, the deepest canyon in North America. They wanted the gold dust that the Chinese had painstakingly accumulated. Historians and scholars debate the exact number of miners. Only 11 names are known. The gold was never recovered.

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Posted in Editorials, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/224 Comments

Letter: ‘The courage of one’s conviction can make a difference’

I read [Mark Lee’s] Nov. 21 column on George W. Bush and Ehren Watada (“Bush and Watada: two intertwining stories”). I whole-heartedly agree with [Lee’s] column comments, and I find this amazing, as I know nothing about [him]. I am grateful for the published statement that … the courage of one’s convictions can make a difference.

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Posted in Letters to the Editor, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

Commentary: 1999-2009: A retrospective on closing the achievement gap

Commentary: 1999-2009: A retrospective on closing the achievement gap

Like the two previous task forces formed in 1986 and 1992, the charge was to have a group of leaders in education and human services to make recommendations to the school district to close the achievement gap — in eight years.

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Posted in Commentaries, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/222 Comments

Nov. 27: Kuan and Yan act as PNB guest conductors

Nov. 27: Kuan and Yan act as PNB guest conductors

Carolyn Kuan, former associate conductor of the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, and Judith Yan, music director/principal conductor of Opera on the Avalon in Canada, were two of four guest conductors for the performances of the Stowell/Sendak version of “The Nutcracker” by the Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB).

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Posted in Names in the News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

Dec. 15: Sakakihara and Tang complete fellowships

Dec. 15: Sakakihara and Tang complete fellowships

Scott Sakakihara is the 2009 Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) Masaoka Fellow and a Harvard Law School graduate.

Shirley Tang is the 2009 JACL Inouye Fellow and a University of California, Davis graduate.

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Posted in Names in the News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

Dec. 5: Winnie Lim receives 2009 president’s Award

Dec. 5: Winnie Lim receives 2009 president’s Award

Winfred “Winnie” Lim was awarded the 2009 President’s Award by the United States Tennis Association (USTA) Pacific Northwest Section Awards Committee. The award was based on his contributions to the sport of tennis. The award was presented to him during the annual USTA Pacific Northwest Awards and Hall of Fame luncheon at the Bellevue Club in Bellevue.

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Posted in Names in the News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

Dec. 12: LIHI opens building named after Jim McDermott

Dec. 12: LIHI opens building named after Jim McDermott

The Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI) opened a 75-unit building called McDermott Place. The building is located in Seattle’s Lake City neighborhood and is dedicated to Congressman Jim McDermott. It will provide permanent supportive housing for 75 homeless men and women, with half of the units reserved for homeless veterans.

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Posted in Names in the News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/221 Comment

Dec. 10: Japanese Mandarin and Pear Expo a success

Dec. 10: Japanese Mandarin and Pear Expo a success

Seattle welcomed Japanese fruit growers as they reintroduced the traditional Japanese Aoshima mandarin orange and the Japanese Tottori 20th Century pear at the Japanese Mandarin and Pear Expo, held at the Washington State Trade and Convention Center.

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Posted in Names in the News, Vol 29 No 3 | 1/16-1/220 Comments

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