Archive | Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/27

“Mao’s Last Dancer” is made of beauty and power

“Mao’s Last Dancer” is made of beauty and power

“Mao’s Last Dancer,” directed by Bruce Beresford, tells the true story of Cunxin Li, a Chinese ballet star who comes to Houston, Texas in 1981 as an exchange student studying at the Houston Ballet. Li (played by Chi Cao, a dancer with the Birmingham Royal Ballet) steps off the plane to a welcoming committee lead by the Houston Ballet’s choreographer, Ben Stevenson (Bruce Greenwood).

Read the full story

Posted in Arts & Entertainment, At the Movies, Reviews, Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

A note about SYLP from Publisher Ng

A note about SYLP from Publisher Ng

         Breaking the mould for Asian American youth   What do you do with high-achieving students who are bad leaders?   I am not blaming parents. We, as parents, lack awareness of the importance of leadership because of how we were raised — not to lead, but to be great students so that […]

Read the full story

Posted in Opinion, Publisher Ng's blog, Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: What is hapa?

SYLP: What is hapa?

In 1990, there were reportedly more than one million multiracial people in the United States. However, the U.S. Census did not recognize people that belonged to more than one race until 2000. Throughout history, multiracial people have been discriminated against and have struggled to find their identity. Today, multiracial people are more easily accepted. Still, it is a hard journey for multiracial children to discover what it means to have a multiracial identity.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/271 Comment

SYLP: I am not bilingual

SYLP: I am not bilingual

The ability to speak a foreign language at an early age is a custom that most Asian families choose to follow. This skill is exceptionally beneficial in expanding the opportunities that a child will have in the future, aiding them in global, personal, and social affairs. But there’s a lot more to it than just that.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/278 Comments

SYLP: Reckless youth

SYLP: Reckless youth

As a child, I was scared of teenagers, not that I ever had much interaction with them. There were a few at church, a couple in the locker rooms at the pool. But mainly, what I knew about teenagers came from comments made by my parents.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: My dad’s story

SYLP: My dad’s story

As a second generation Asian American from a family of refugees, I think it’s important to document my parents’ oral history. When I asked my dad what his experiences were like in fleeing his homeland, Vietnam, he readily opened up.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/271 Comment

SYLP: The struggles of Asian immigrants

SYLP: The struggles of Asian immigrants

I remember when we first announced that we were emigrating to the United States. Everyone was congratulating us, and we were considered the lucky ones. They told us that we’ll soon be able to live in a country with high living standards and many new opportunities waiting to be explored. But in reality, are we really lucky?

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/272 Comments

SYLP: Is there a difference between a refugee and an immigrant?

SYLP: Is there a difference between a refugee and an immigrant?

Is there a difference between a refugee and an immigrant? Yes, there is a difference. Many don’t know or understand the difference between a refugee and an immigrant.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/272 Comments

SYLP: For parents, what comes first?

SYLP: For parents, what comes first?

With the economy as it is today, everyone is clinging to their job as if it were their lifeline — and in some cases, it is. However, when my dad lost his job at the start of this month, his siblings applauded. “Now you can focus more time on your son,” they said.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Women in China: the past and the present

SYLP: Women in China: the past and the present

There are two very popular Chinese sayings: “The great virtue of a woman is to have no talent” and “It is more beneficial to raise geese than daughters.” These expose the low regard of Chinese women in traditional Chinese society

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: The meaning of success …

SYLP: The meaning of success …

What is the meaning of success? That is a hard question to answer because everybody has a different definition. Other people think my father is successful because he is a great cardiac surgeon and has saved many lives. Other people think my grandfather is successful because he has a great and loyal son. Other people think my little cousin is successful because she has the best grades in her class.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Pursuing dreams …

SYLP: Pursuing dreams …

Whether you realize it or not, we all have the dream to pursue a career in something that we love. Some may love art, while others love music. However, many obstacles are placed along the path to achieving your dream.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Poetry …

SYLP: Poetry …

Is poetry just all about rhyming?
Is it just about words that flow? Is it just how you express yourself?
To me, poetry can have all these aspects, but it is way more than just these three things.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: In Pictures

SYLP: In Pictures

As the photographer for the Summer Youth Leadership Program, it was my job to capture the memories to be displayed in our yearbook, and what a fun job it was!

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Calling on the American ambassador

SYLP: Calling on the American ambassador

Not long ago, I was extensively involved in the college admissions process. I remember a particular interview with an alumnus, and we had a discussion about the implications of my studies in history — why was it so important to remember my cultural identity?

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: When two worlds meet

SYLP: When two worlds meet

From the moment they see you to the moment you open your mouth, it allows another person to form a first impression. When I walk into a room, people see that I am Asian. It is human nature and the first thing anyone would see.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Maintaining cultural identity

SYLP: Maintaining cultural identity

I am Vietnamese. However, I don’t feel as if I’ve really embraced the Vietnamese culture. My parents were born in Vietnam and they immigrated here. As they struggled to save money, start new lives, and support their kids, my life has been that of an average American kid — an opportunity that my parents had to work hard for.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Too Asian?

SYLP: Too Asian?

Asian American students are often labeled as the model minority because of their high rates of success throughout schools in America.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Racial profiling

SYLP: Racial profiling

Many think that racial profiling ended along with racism when all Americans, regardless of color, were given equal rights. However, that is not the case. One of the most recent examples was when Arizona passed a law that allowed officers to stop people that are suspected as illegal immigrants.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

SYLP: Asian misconceptions

SYLP: Asian misconceptions

“Asians are bad drivers.” “Asians are passive, timid, and shy.” “Asians excel in the school subjects of math and science.” These are just a few of many other stereotypes against the Asian ethnicity. It is a serious problem that we are facing today.

Read the full story

Posted in Vol 29 No 34 | 8/21-8/270 Comments

Page 112

Community Calendar

Weekly E-Newsletter

READ NWAW ONLINE!

Follow our tweets

Do you like us?

Photos on flickr