Immigrants fueling a U.S. boom in cricket

By Frank Eltman
Associated Press

EAST ISLIP, New York (AP) – Cricket, the international game of bats and balls that isn’t baseball, is enjoying a surge of popularity in America, with the debut of a national league this spring and higher demand to build “pitches” across the country.

Areas such as New York City, California’s Silicon Valley, Washington, D.C., Dallas, and Chicago have become cricket hotbeds, fueled by an influx of mostly South Asian immigrants, some of whom arrived as part of the high-tech boom.

In the immigrant-rich New York area, cricket has become so popular that lotteries are being held for the chance to play in pitches at some parks. New York City schools still have the only varsity cricket league in the country, but it has doubled in size in just seven years, with 30 teams now competing for the title.

A national traveling league, the American Cricket Champions League, began this spring and has 17 teams from Boston to Los Angeles vying a for a six-team playoff tournament.

For 17-year-old Akash Chowdhury, who arrived in New York City four years ago from Bangladesh and plays in the city schools league, cricket has helped smooth the transition to his new home.

His Brooklyn International High School team, outfitted with crisp, white uniforms and batting helmets like the stars they follow on cable television, often play their games in the outfields of idle baseball diamonds.

“Playing cricket in America helps me remember my back country,” Chowdhury said. “But I really don’t miss it like that, because I can play here.”

In the past several years, communities in states from Maryland to Indiana have taken initiatives to organize youth leagues and build cricket facilities. The United States Youth Cricket Association has donated 1,500 sets of cricket equipment — bats, balls and wickets — to community youth programs around the country.

John Aaron, executive secretary of the American Cricket Federation, compares cricket in the United States to where soccer was just a few decades ago.

“When soccer first started here, people said it’s not going to go anywhere — American football is the thing,” Aaron said. “Soccer has not replaced American football, but it has certainly taken off now, hasn’t it? Cricket can do the same thing.” (end)

Associated Press video journalist David Martin contributed to this report.

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