IDENTITY: Losing the Chinese culture

http://nwasianweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/30_36/daniel.JPGBy Daniel Luke
SYLP student

Over the past two to three decades, the rapid growth of modernization across the globe has caused much more value to be put into the educational system and technology. Living side-by-side with this fast-paced society, things became very hectic.

However, if we look beyond the past 20 to 30 years, at a more cultural aspect of life, we see that traditions, customs, and beliefs were held much in reverence, as opposed to the life nowadays. However, the question that always persists whenever we’re moving on toward a new age is this:

Are we ready for such a test and would it be beneficial for society to take this next step?

For example, when the Scientific Revolution began around the 1300s to 1400s, many people were opposed to the idea, but in the end, the world ended up gaining vast amounts of knowledge about their immediate surroundings than they previously thought was possible.

Before Christopher Columbus, most Europeans thought that the world was flat, but in the end, he proved them wrong. But now, you may ask, “How does this relate to losing the Chinese culture?” The answer is relatively simple. As the world is getting more and more modernized, we see less and less time for families to get together and express their traditional beliefs.

Why is this significant? The reason is that according to research, people who follow their traditional beliefs have more morals than people who don’t, and it is such for that fact that we ought to preserve this dying culture. It doesn’t matter what background you are from or what ethnicity you are. All that matters is that by at least acknowledging your roots, you will be able to see how your predecessors dealt with their surroundings and environment and how it can be beneficial for you, too. ♦

Editor’s note: Northwest Asian Weekly was unable to verify all the facts stated in this article. The ideas here do not necessarily represent our stance.

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